The Literature Program

Events+Lectures

The Literature Program

Upcoming Events

Past Events

                  

2017

Monday, November 13, 2017
A Reading by Elizabeth Hand
The Nebula and World Fantasy Award–winning author reads from Saffron and Brimstone
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm
On Monday, November 13, at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, the fantasy writer and critic Elizabeth Hand reads from her fiction collection Saffron and Brimstone. Presented by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by novelist and Bard literature professor Bradford Morrow, and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Bard's literary journal, Conjunctions, will be giving away copies of its Other Aliens issue, coedited by Hand and Morrow.

Elizabeth Hand flunked out of college a couple of years after seeing Patti Smith perform and became involved in the nascent punk scenes in DC and New York. From 1979 to 1986 she worked at the Smithsonian Institution's National Air & Space Museum before returning to university to study cultural anthropology. Her many books include Hard Light, Radiant Days, Available Dark, Generation Loss, and Ilyria. Her fiction has received the Nebula, World Fantasy, Mythopeoic, Tiptree, and International Horror Guild Awards, and her novels have been chosen as notable books by the New York Times and Washington Post. Hand also writes spin-offs, tie-ins, and novelizations of such films as X-Files, Stars Wars, and 12 Monkeys; and contributed a take on the Bride of Frankenstein to Dark Horse Comics' series of classic movie monster novels.
PRAISE FOR ELIZABETH HAND
"Waking the Moon is a potent socio-erotic ghost story[, while] Elizabeth Hand's Cass Neary novels, rightly praised for their icy tension and remarkable darkness, are threaded, like the best of punk in any medium, on a bloodied yet admirably stubborn humanism." —William Gibson

"Hand's work is pulsing with tension throughout, charged with its own chilling luminosity." ―Washington Post

"Elizabeth Hand's prose is a wiry, intelligent force that ranges from blunt athleticism to fluid luminosity. The propulsive power of her narrative is all the more stunning for her meticulous observation of sensory detail, art, and the human complexity it reveals. Ferocious, aching with compassion and cruelly brilliant, Available Dark is a sinful pleasure." ―Katherine Dunn

"Poignant and terrifying by turns, Last Summer at Mars Hill isn't for the easily shocked, but it will satisfy readers who long for rich prose and deep, dark dreams." —Publishers Weekly

Any supporter who donates $500 or more to Bard’s literary journal Conjunctions receives a BackPage Pass providing VIP access to any Fall 2017 or future event in the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series. Have lunch with a visiting author, attend a seminar on their work, and receive premium seating at their reading. Or you can give your BackPage Pass to a lover of literature on your gift list! To find out more, click here or contact Nicole Nyhan at conjunctions@bard.edu or (845) 758-7054.
Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Nicole Nyhan  845-758-7054  nnyhan@bard.edu
  Friday, November 3, 2017
IWT Writer as Reader One-Day Workshops: November
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  8:30 am – 4:30 pm
Writer as Reader workshops highlight writing-to-read strategies that foster close reading; invite connections to the text’s cultural, social, economic, and artistic contexts; and help readers develop an appreciation for the connections between different but related texts.

This year we will include sessions on novels, poetry, nonfiction, historical documents, STEM texts, and other media. As educators have come to expect, these workshops focus on putting texts into conversations with other texts, with historical events, and digital media.  The “Writer as Reader” workshops also model writing and reading activities that can focus class discussion, help students engage with difficult material, and emphasize the social character of all learning.
 
To register online, visit www.writingandthinking.org.  If you have any questions or concerns, please don't hesistate to get in touch.  Email us at iwt@bard.edu or call us at (845) 752-4516.
Sponsored by: Institute for Writing and Thinking
Contact: Paloma Dooley  845-752-4516  iwt@bard.edu
Wednesday, November 1, 2017
The French Resistance
Charles B. Potter, Professor of History at the Institute for American Universities in Aix-en-Provence
Olin, Room 102  6:45 pm

Charles B. Potter, Professor of History at the Institute for American Universities in Aix-en-Provence and former professor of NYU, in a conversation with Elizabeth Frank, Division of Languages & Literature at Bard College, about his recent book The Resistance, 1940: An Anthology of Writings from the French Underground (LSU Press 2016)Translated from French into English for the first time.

Free and open to the public.
 
Sponsored by: French Studies Program; Hannah Arendt Center; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Program; Literature Program
Contact: Elizabeth Frank  845-758-7220  frank@bard.edu
Tuesday, October 31, 2017
An Evening with French Writer Mathias Énard
Introduced by Francine Prose
In conversation with Charlotte Mandell, his translator.

Olin, Room 102  5:00 pm
“Énard has written a masterful novel that speaks to our current, confused moment in history by highlighting the manifold, vital contributions of Islamic and other Middle Eastern cultures to the European canon. More than that, it points toward, as one character puts it, ‘a new vision that includes the other in the self.’ ” Andrew Ervin, The Washington Post

French novelist Mathias Énard is the award-winning author of Zone (2008) and Street of Thieves (2012), and a translator from Persian and Arabic. He won the Prix Goncourt (France’s oldest and most prestigious literary prize) in 2015 for Compass. The novel, translated like previous ones by Bard’s own Charlotte Mandell, was shortlisted for the 2017 Man Booker International Prize.

For more information, please contact Professor Éric Trudel at trudel@bard.edu
Sponsored by: Division of Languages and Literature; French Studies Program; Written Arts Program; the Book Department at the Cultural Services of the French Embassy
Contact: √Čric Trudel  trudel@bard.edu
Monday, October 30, 2017
A Reading by Diane Ackerman
The celebrated author reads from The Zookeeper’s Wife
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm
On Monday, October 30, at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, Diane Ackerman reads from The Zookeeper’s Wife. Presented by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by novelist and Bard literature professor Bradford Morrow, and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

The Zookeeper’s Wife, a little known true story of WWII, enjoyed months as the New York Times #1 nonfiction bestseller, was the basis for the 2017 feature film of the same title, and received the Orion Book Award, which honored it as “a groundbreaking work of nonfiction, in which the human relationship to nature is explored in an absolutely original way through looking at the Holocaust. A few years ago, ‘nature’ writers were asking themselves, How can a book be at the same time a work of art, an act of conscientious objection to the destruction of the world, and an affirmation of hope and human decency? The Zookeeper’s Wife answers this question.”

Diane Ackerman’s other works of nonfiction include An Alchemy of Mind, a poetics of the brain based on the latest neuroscience; Deep Play, which considers play, creativity, and our need for transcendence; A Slender Thread, about her work as a crisis line counselor; The Rarest of the Rare and The Moon by Whale Light, in which she explores the plight and fascination of endangered animals; On Extended Wings, her memoir of flying; and her bestseller, A Natural History of the Senses. Her most recent book, The Human Age: The World Shaped by Us, a celebration of the natural world and human ingenuity, and an exploration of human-driven planetary change, received the P.E.N. Henry David Thoreau Award for Nature Writing.

Several of Ackerman's books have been Pulitzer Prize and National Book Circle Critics Award finalists. She also has the rare distinction of having a molecule named after her—dianeackerone— a pheromone in crocodilians. Her essays about nature and human nature have been appearing for decades in the New York Times, New Yorker, American Scholar, Smithsonian, National Geographic, and elsewhere.

Any supporter who donates $500 or more to Bard’s literary journal Conjunctions receives a BackPage Pass providing VIP access to any Fall 2017 or future event in the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series. Have lunch with a visiting author, attend a seminar on their work, and receive premium seating at their reading. Or you can give your BackPage Pass to a lover of literature on your gift list! To find out more, click here or contact Micaela Morrissette at conjunctions@bard.edu or (845) 758-7054.
Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, October 19, 2017
Till we have built Jerusalem: Architects of a New City
Adina Hoffman 
Olin, Room 102  6:00 pm
Award-winning essayist and biographer Adina Hoffman will discuss her book, Till We Have Built Jerusalem, which is a gripping and intimate journey into the lives of three very different architects who helped shape modern Jerusalem.  A powerfully written rumination on memory and forgetting, place and displacement, the book uncovers multiple layers of one great city's buried history as it asks what it means, in Jerusalem and everywhere, to be foreign and to belong. 
             
Adina Hoffman is the author of House of Windows: Portraits from a Jerusalem Neighborhood, My Happiness Bears No Relation to Happiness: A Poet's Life in the Palestinian Century, and, with Peter Cole, Sacred Trash: The Lost and Found World of the Cairo Geniza, which won the American Library Association's prize for the best Jewish book of 2011. The Los Angeles Times called her most recent book, Till We Have Built Jerusalem: Architects of a New City, “brave and often beautiful,” and Haaretz described it as “a passionate, lyrical defense of a Jerusalem that could still be.” A Guggenheim Foundation Fellow and one of the inaugural winners of the Windham Campbell Literary Prizes, she divides her time between Jerusalem and New Haven.
 
 
Praise for Till We Have Built Jerusalem
“A fascinating synthesis that manages to distill biography, history, politics, aesthetics, religion and psychology into one illuminating, lively, witty text. This is one of the finest books I’ve ever read on the difficult, fragile arts of architecture and city-making.” - Phillip Lopate
 
“Adina Hoffman does for Jerusalem what great writers have done for Paris, London, and New York: with charm, skill, and originality, she weaves together a vivid social and architectural history of one of the fabled cities of the world.” - Vivian Gornick
 
“Adina Hoffman is that very rare writer who moves lightly across vast realms of knowledge, transmuting the most intransigent material into illuminating and affecting narratives. Here is a book about the making of a city that is as emotionally potent as it is intellectually bracing.” - Pankaj Mishra

For more info please contact romm@bard.edu
Sponsored by: Classical Studies Program; Division of Languages and Literature; Jewish Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Religion Program; Written Arts Program
Contact:
Tuesday, October 17, 2017
Hymns & Qualms
A reading by poet and translator Peter Cole (Yale University)
 

Weis Cinema  5:00 pm
MacArthur winner Peter Cole reads from his new book, Hymns & Qualms: New and Selected Poems and Translations. Praised for his “prosodic mastery” and “keen moral intelligence” (American Poets), and for the “rigor, vigor, joy, and wit” of his poetry (The Paris Review), Cole has created a vital, unclassifiable body of work. His poetry, writes Ben Lerner, “is remarkable for its combination of intellectual rigor with delight in surface, for how its prosody returns each abstraction to the body, linking thought and breath, metaphysics and musicality. Religious, erotic, elegiac, pissed off – the affective range is wide and the forms restless.”
 
Hymns & Qualms is a majestic work, a chronicle of the imaginative life of a profoundly spiritual consciousness.”
—Harold Bloom
 
 
 
 
 
For more info please contact romm@bard.edu
 
Sponsored by: Classical Studies Program; Jewish Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Religion Program; Written Arts Program
Contact:
Monday, October 16, 2017
Promising Beginnings and Arrested Developments: Early Arabic Translations of the Novel in Egypt, Lebanon and Palestine
Maya Issam Kesrouany, Assistant Professor of Modern Arabic Literature, New York University Abu Dhabi (NYUAD)
 

Olin, Room 202  6:00 pm
This talk looks at specific texts that borrow from three European novels through creative translation, effectively transforming the originals, but maintaining their original alienness from the new reading culture they find themselves in. Such creative appropriation can tell us a lot about the early borrowing of fictional narrative precisely as a form of negotiation and not full reproduction. Comparing the different ways translators engaged with the original novels also complicates what they thought of as “modern,” “fiction” and how they theorized the “worlds” of their works. 

Maya Issam Kesrouany, Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, is an assistant professor of Modern Arabic Literature at New York University Abu Dhabi (NYUAD). Her book manuscript "Prophetic Translation: The Promise of European Literature in the Egyptian Imaginary" is forthcoming with Edinburgh University Press. Her research interests include nationalism and political imaginaries; civil society formations and the public sphere; critical translation theory; the politics of language, literary form and genre. She has taught at Emory University, the American University of Beirut, and the American University of Sharjah.

co-sponsors: Literature Program and the Translation Initiative 
Sponsored by: Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Dina Ramadan  845-758-7506  dramadan@bard.edu
Monday, October 16, 2017
Emma Smith-Stevens '09: Fiction Reading & Conversation
The Bard alumna reads from her first novel and discusses life after Bard
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  4:40 pm – 6:00 pm
Join the Written Arts Senior Colloquium for a free public event with Emma Smith-Stevens on Monday, October 16, at 4:40 p.m. in Weis Cinema.

Smith-Stevens will read from her work and talk with current students about her post-Bard personal, educational, career, and literary development.

Smith-Stevens is the author of a novel, The Australian (Dzanc, May 2017), and a short story collection, Greyhounds (Dzanc). A graduate of Bard's Program in Written Arts, she has been a server at a pancake house in Delray Beach, FL, a gift-wrapper in Boca Raton, a personal assistant in Los Angeles, a scriptwriter for virtual patients used by nursing students, and an instructor at the University of Florida, Santa Fe College, and the Bard Prison Initiative. Her writing has appeared in Conjunctions, BOMB Magazine, Day One, Subtropics, and elsewhere. Her essay "The Sun" will be included in the anthology Not That Bad: Dispatches From Rape Culture (Eds. Roxane Gay and Ashley C Ford) forthcoming from Harper Perennial. She holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of Florida and is currently at work on a memoir. She lives in New York.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Corinna Cape  845-752-4454  writtenarts@bard.edu
Monday, October 2, 2017
The Prague Sonata
A Conversation with Bradford Morrow and Mary Caponegro
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  4:45 pm
Monday, October 2nd, at 4:45 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, Bradford Morrow presents a reading from his brand-new novel, The Prague Sonata. Hailed as "an elegant foray into music and memory" (Kirkus Reviews), the novel revolves around an unsolved eighteenth-century musical mystery that transports readers between Nazi-occupied Prague and turn-of-the-millennium New York. This event also features Morrow in conversation with Richard B. Fisher Family Professor in Literature and Writing at Bard, Mary Caponegro.

Bard Center Fellow, Conjunctions editor, novelist, and Bard literature professor, Morrow is the author of novels including Trinity Fields, The Forgers, and The Almanac Branch. His many awards and honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship in fiction, O. Henry and Pushcart prizes for his short stories, an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the PEN/Nora Magid Award for excellence in editing a literary journal. 

Mary Caponegro has authored numerous short story collections including All Fall Down, The Complexities of Intimacy, The Star Café, and Five Doubts. Among her accolades are the General Electric Foundation Award for Younger Writers, the Rome Prize Fellowship in Literature from American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, and the Bruno Arcudi Award.

Refreshments will be served. Oblong Books will offer copies of The Prague Sonata for sale.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Corinna Cape  845-758-6822 x4454  writtenarts@bard.edu
  Friday, September 29, 2017
NEW!  IWT Writer as Reader One-Day Workshops: September
Early Bird deadline extended!
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  8:30 am – 4:30 am
Writer as Reader workshops highlight writing-to-read strategies that foster close reading; invite connections to the text’s cultural, social, economic, and artistic contexts; and help readers develop an appreciation for the connections between different but related texts.
This year we will include sessions on novels, poetry, nonfiction, historical documents, STEM texts, and other media. As educators have come to expect, these workshops focus on putting texts into conversations with other texts, with historical events, and digital media.  The “Writer as Reader” workshops also model writing and reading activities that can focus class discussion, help students engage with difficult material, and emphasize the social character of all learning.
 
To register online, visit www.writingandthinking.org.  If you have any questions or concerns, please don't hesistate to get in touch.  Email us at iwt@bard.edu or call us at (845) 752-4516
Sponsored by: Institute for Writing and Thinking
Contact: Paloma Dooley  845-752-4516  iwt@bard.edu
  Wednesday, September 27, 2017
Histories of Violence: Killing, Communication and Memory in United Italy
Professor David Forgacs, New York University
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:30 pm
Episodes of public violence have recurred at several key moments in the formation and consolidation of the modern Italian state: wars of unification, colonial wars, labor protests and social unrest repressed by police or the military, civil conflicts during the rise and subsequent fall of fascism, terrorism, stragismo, mafia violence. The lecture examines the long history of violence in contemporary Italy, from 1848 to 2015, and suggests that several of these instances of public violence are linked to problems of legitimation of political authority. The lecture looks also at the communication and transmission of memory in connecting or separating different moments of violence, as well as at the near-total erasure of certain episodes of mass violence from the historical record.
Sponsored by: Division of Languages and Literature; Human Rights Program; Italian Studies Program; Literature Program
Contact: Franco Baldasso  845-758-7337  baldasso@bard.edu
Monday, September 25, 2017
A Reading by Quincy Troupe
The American Book Award–winning poet, journalist, and Miles Davis biographer reads from his work
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm
The founding editor of Confrontation and author of James Baldwin: The Legacy, Miles: The Autobiography, Miles and Me: A Memoir of Miles Davis, and poetry collections including Errançities reads from his work at 2:30 p.m. on Monday, September 25, 2017, in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center. Presented by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by novelist and Bard literature professor Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

In addition to his work as a biographer and essayist, Troupe has published many collections of poems, including The Architecture of Language, Transcircularities: New and Selected Poems, and Snake-Back Solos: Selected Poems 1969–1977, which received an American Book Award.

He has received honors and awards from the National Foundation for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts; and served as poet laureate of the state of California.
PRAISE FOR QUINCY TROUPE
"It has been said that Miles Davis was a great poet on his instrument. In a similar vein, it can be said that Quincy Troupe is a great instrument in his poetic delivery. As fate would have it, these two very talented individuals would form a mutual and intriguing bond. Miles and Me, Quincy Troupe's latest book, is an honest, serious and sometimes hilarious memoir of his warm and cherished friendship with Miles Davis." —QBR: The Black Book Review

"Brilliant, poetic, provocative, Quincy Troupe's Miles and Me reveals the man behind the dark glasses and legend." —Ishmael Reed

Any supporter who donates $500 or more to Bard’s literary journal Conjunctions receives a BackPage Pass providing VIP access to any Fall 2017 or future event in the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series. Have lunch with a visiting author, attend a seminar on their work, and receive premium seating at their reading. Or you can give your BackPage Pass to a lover of literature on your gift list! To find out more, click here or contact Nicole Nyhan at conjunctions@bard.edu or (845) 758-7054.
Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Monday, September 18, 2017
“Never Catch Me”: False Endings in Black Music from the Soul Era to the Present
Emily Lordi, Associate Professor of English
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

RKC 103  6:15 pm
Often invoked but seldom defined, the word “soul” occupies a central yet slippery place in the African American cultural tradition. Is it a musical genre? A racial essence? A spiritual quality? I believe it is none of the above, exactly, but instead a story about black experience that we can read through generations of musical practice. In the late-1960s, soul emerged as a name for the social and aesthetic grace wrought from racialized pressure—what black people earned by surviving the historical and daily trials of white supremacy. One of the musical manifestations of this concept, I suggest, was the “false ending,” the practice of bringing a song to its close only to strike it back up for another chorus or two. This strategy structurally enacted—and, thanks to its evident roots in gospel music, helped to render sacred— soul’s message of black group resilience. 

After discussing false endings in the work of Mahalia Jackson, Aretha Franklin, and Marvin Gaye, I will suggest this device finds its contemporary counterpart in two recent music videos: Flying Lotus (and Kendrick Lamar)’s “Never Catch Me,” which begins with a false ending by staging the death and resurrection of two black children; and Beyoncé’s Lemonade, which likewise begins with a suicidal swan-dive that initiates the visual album’s healing journey. To trace this device through the Black Lives Matter era is to see how what scholars call “post-soul aesthetics” are in fact haunted by the “false ending” that is the supposed death of soul itself—and, more to the point, by the persistent need for the models soul offers for translating black loss into what theorist Fred Moten calls a “will to proceed” against intractable odds.
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Ethnomusicology; Literature Program
Contact: Peter L'Official  845-758-7556  ploffici@bard.edu
  Thursday, May 18, 2017
Written Arts Senior Project Readings
Night 3 of 3
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:00 pm
At 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, please join the graduating seniors of the Program in Written Arts as they present short readings from their projects in fiction, poetry, narrative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Refreshments will be provided, and all are welcome.

Readers for May 18: Caridad Cole Kelsey Johnson Cleo Egnal Amelia Walsh Charles Noyes Branford Walker Marita Dancy Mason Segall Phoebe Present Wilberforce Strand
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
  Monday, May 15, 2017
Written Arts Senior Project Readings
Night 2 of 3
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:00 pm
At 6:00 p.m. on Monday, May 15, 2017, in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, please join the graduating seniors of the Program in Written Arts as they present short readings from their projects in fiction, poetry, narrative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Refreshments will be provided, and all are welcome.

Readers for May 15: Caridad Cole Krisdee Dishmon Beatrice Wedd Madeline Hopfield Alexander Adams Lila Dunlap Caroline Petty Abby Freaney Sofia Ortiz
This is a three-night series, with the final Written Arts project reading coming up on May 18, also in Weis at 6:00 p.m.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
  Friday, May 12, 2017
DREAMING GROUNDS
a senior project poetry reading
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Tessa Menatian & Taylor Cantrall read from their senior projects in poetry on the beginnings & ends of worlds. Refreshments will be served.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Tessa Menatian  845-758-7054  tm0894@bard.edu
  Thursday, May 11, 2017
Written Arts Senior Project Readings
Night 1 of 3
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:00 pm
At 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, May 11, 2017, in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, please join the graduating seniors of the Program in Written Arts as they present short readings from their projects in fiction, poetry, narrative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Refreshments will be provided, and all are welcome.

Readers for May 11: Erin O'Leary Ethan Levenson Amelia Maggio Terrence Arjoon Matt Balik Steven Ricaurte Horton Fisher Robert Crane Ella Scott Johanna Costigan
This is a three-night series, with additional Written Arts project readings coming up on May 15 and May 18, all in Weis at 6:00 p.m.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Monday, May 1, 2017
Shafer House Social with Alaa Al-Aswany
Kick back after Advising Day and enjoy some snacks and conversation with Written Arts
Shafer House  6:00 pm
Monday, May 1, at 6:00 p.m., the Program in Written Arts welcomes all Bard students, faculty, and staff to an informal get-together celebrating our Spring 2017 distinguished writer in residence, the Egyptian novelist Alaa Al-Aswany, at the program's Shafer House headquarters on south campus opposite the Annandale Triangle. 

Come take a load off after your advising meetings to snack and relax with your student colleagues, Alaa, and other members of the Written Arts faculty. 
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Friday, April 28, 2017
Examined Lives
Reading and Writing Biography
Bard College Speakers Include:
   Richard Aldous
   Myra Armstead 
   Bruce Chilton 
   Deirdre d’Albertis 
   Elizabeth Frank
   Orson Fry
   Vik Joshi
   Joseph Luzzi
   Mark Lytle
   Francine Prose
   James Romm
   Michael Staunton
   Karen Sullivan
 

Campus Center, Meeting Room 214  9:00 am – 4:30 pm
A conference on biography across the disciplines.

All are welcome!
Sponsored by: Literature Program; Medieval Studies Program
Contact: Michael Staunton  845-758-7204  mstaunton@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 11, 2017
Ruth Gilligan, Professor of Creative Writing, University of Birmingham (UK)
Reading from Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan, a novel based around the history of the Jewish community in Ireland
RKC 103  5:00 pm
Ruth Gilligan is an Irish-born novelist and professor of creative writing at the University of Birmingham (UK). Her fourth novel, Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan is based around the history of the Jewish community in Ireland, and was recently published by Atlantic Books and Tin House to much acclaim.

At the start of the twentieth century, a young girl and her family emigrate from Europe in search of a better life in America, only to pitch up in Ireland by mistake. In 1958, a mute boy locked away in a mental institution outside Dublin forms an unlikely friendship with a man consumed by the story of the love he lost nearly two decades earlier. And in present-day London, an Irish journalist is forced to confront her conflicting notions of identity and family when her Jewish boyfriend asks her to make a true leap of faith. Spanning generations and braiding together three unforgettable voices, Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan shows us what it means to belong, and how storytelling can redeem us all.
Sponsored by: Irish and Celtic Studies (ICS) Program; Jewish Studies Program; Literature Program
Contact: Michael Staunton  845-758-7571  mstaunton@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 11, 2017
Unbroken Glass
Documentary Film Screening and Q&A with the Director, Dinesh Sabu
Preston Hall 110  4:45 pm
Twenty years after the death of his parents, Indian-American filmmaker Dinesh Sabu begins a journey to finally piece together their story. Uncovering a silenced family history of mental illness, Sabu confronts the legacy of having a schizophrenic mother who died by suicide, the reality of growing up an orphaned immigrant, and the trauma of these events. Raised by his older siblings, Sabu had little idea who his parents were or where he came from. Through making Unbroken Glass, he attempts to put together their story and his own. 
Sponsored by: Asian Studies Program; Economics Program; Experimental Humanities Program; Psychology Program
Contact: Maria Cecire  845-876-7697  mcecire@bard.edu
Monday, April 10, 2017
A Reading by Paul Lisicky
The 2016 Guggenheim fellow reads from his memoir The Narrow Door
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm
The author of Lawnboy reads from his new memoir, The Narrow Door, at 2:30 p.m. on Monday, April 10th, 2017, in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center. Sponsored by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

PAUL LISICKY is the author of The Narrow Door, Unbuilt Projects, The Burning House, Famous Builder, and Lawnboy, and the editor of StoryQuarterly. A 2016 Guggenheim Fellow, he has also received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the James Michener/Copernicus Society, the Corporation of Yaddo, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. He currently teaches in the MFA Program at Rutgers University-Camden, the low residency program at Sierra Nevada College, and at the Juniper Summer Writing Institute.

Read his work in Conjunctions’ weekly online magazine, and read and hear his contribution to Conjunctions:61, A Menagerie.
PRAISE FOR PAUL LISICKY
“Intelligent and intimate, fierce and tender, real and raw, Paul Lisicky’s The Narrow Door is an unforgettable memoir about love and loss, friendship and forgiveness. It had me in its thrall from page one.”—Cheryl Strayed

“You know you’re reading an exceptional book when, approximately two sentences into it, you start panicking at the thought of its ending. Be forewarned: this is likely to happen to you, as it did to me, reading the opening pages of The Narrow Door, the achingly gorgeous, wildly ambitious memoir by Paul Lisicky.” —Chicago Tribune

“Paul Lisicky’s The Narrow Door circumvents the often inscrutable forces that bring us in and out of each other’s lives and hearts, while paying welcome homage to the oft-unsung role of friendship in them. While Lisicky bears witness to ‘the hell of wanting [that] has no cure,’ his ship always feels buoyant, by virtue of a narrator whose attentiveness to feelings both big and small is marked throughout by honesty and devotion.” —Maggie Nelson

Any supporter who donates $500 or more to Bard’s literary journal Conjunctions receives a BackPage Pass providing VIP access to any Spring/Fall 2017 or future event in the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series. Have lunch with a visiting author, attend a seminar on their work, and receive premium seating at their reading. Or you can give your BackPage Pass to a lover of literature on your gift list! To find out more, click here or contact Micaela Morrissette at conjunctions@bard.edu or (845) 758-7054.
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, April 6, 2017
A Poetry Reading with Jared Stanley and Michael Ives
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:00 pm
Jared Stanley is a poet, writer, teacher, and interdisciplinary artist. He has published three collections of poetry: Ears (Nightboat 2017), The Weeds (Salt 2012), and Book Made of Forest, which won Salt Publishing's Crashaw Prize in 2008. Stanley's poems "urge us," Tim Z. Hernandez writes, "to reconsider our man-made constructs of flora/fauna/naturaleza, which is to say, barriers and infinities." His art work is interested in how states talk to themselves through bureaucratic decoration: awarding medals, notarizing documents, and explaining landscapes. Recent essays and poems have appeared in Triple Canopy, Literary Hub, The Academy of American Poets, and the Columbia Review. Stanley was born in Arizona, grew up in California, and now lives in Nevada, where he teaches at Sierra Nevada College.

Michael Ives is a writer, musician, and sound/text performer living in the Hudson Valley. His poetry and fiction have appeared in numerous magazines and journals in the United States and abroad. He is the author of Wavetable (Dr. Cicero Books, 2015) and The External Combustion Engine (Futurepoem, 2005) and has taught in the Written Arts Program at Bard College since 2003.
 
Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program; Literature Program; Written Arts Program
Contact: Marisa Libbon  845-758-7211  mlibbon@bard.edu
Wednesday, April 5, 2017
A Reading by Edie Meidav
The former winner of the Bard Fiction Prize and author of Lola, California reads from her new fiction collection
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:00 pm
At 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 5, Edie Meidav reads from her new collection of short stories in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, introduced by Mary Caponegro and followed by a Q&A. This event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

"Edie Meidav makes sentences perform like a snake-charmer's snakes," says Luc Sante, while Joanna Scott calls her "a fearless writer with a cosmic imagination." The winner of the 2005 Bard Fiction Prize and a Conjunctions senior editor, Meidav is a former Bard writer in residence and the former director of the Writing and Consciousness Program at the New College of California, San Francisco. Her novels include The Far Field, Crawl Space, and Lola, California.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Monday, April 3, 2017
Student-Run Written Arts Feedback Group
For student writers of all creative genres, a student-run space to share work in progress and ask for feedback
Olin , 3rd floor  8:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Are you looking for some honest peer feedback on your work? Come read and discuss student writing and snack in a low-pressure environment on the top floor of Olin. All majors, years, and genres are welcome.

The focus of this meeting will be the sharing of finished written work, via readings of between three and ten minutes each. One can come just to hear others read; sharing is not mandatory. All classes welcome.

Email Alex Adams (aa6851@bard.edu) with questions. 
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
  Friday, March 31, 2017
LUX Fiction & Poetry Reading
Join LUX Literary Magazine for an evening of readings by students and faculty
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  7:30 pm
Friday, March 31, at 7:30 p.m. in Bard Hall, the student literary journal LUX is pleased to presented an evening of readings.

Featured readers include:
Morgan Bielawski
Marita Dancy
Helli Fang
Charlotte Foreman
Ann Lauterbach
Micaela Morrissette
Wilberforce Strand

Light refreshments will be provided. To learn more, RSVP, and share this event with others, visit https://www.facebook.com/events/1874977642784925/.

LUX provides an open forum for the art and writing communities at Bard.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Charles Noyes  cn8920@bard.edu
Friday, March 31, 2017
A Reading by Dawn Lundy Martin
The author of Life in a Box Is a Pretty Life reads from her poems
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  5:00 pm
At 5:00 p.m. on Friday, March 31, in Bard Hall, the John Ashbery Poetry Series presents a reading by Dawn Lundy Martin.

The activist poet and editor, winner of the Cave Canem Prize and Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Poetry, and cofounder of the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics at the University of Pittsburgh is also the author of such books as A Gathering of Matter/A Matter of Gathering, Discipline, and the forthcoming Good Stock Strange Blood.

Introduced by Ann Lauterbach and followed by a conversation and Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

"Every time I read Good Stock Strange Blood, a new, deepened book awaits me. Which is to say, it’s got trap doors, trick sleeves; it takes swerves, detours, and dives. Dawn Lundy Martin’s poems read like a real-time excavation of what poetry can and can't do; how the past is never past; how to stand in the blur, the 'griefmouth' of personal and collective pain and somehow—against all odds—make thought, make fury, make song. We need this resilience, this bloody reckoning, this wit and nuance, now." —Maggie Nelson

"A relentless pressure placed on the body that is fetishized, shackled, split, strangled, beaten, hated, compressed, trashed, drowned, measured, mirrored, dragged, discarded, disappeared, opened, punctured, displayed, encased. The question of 'what allows the body to survive' is at the heart of Good Stock Strange Blood. If there's an answer in this book to that question, then perhaps it has to do with how we confront and give words and breath and sound and silence to a life of meticulously drawn images that are ghostly, brutal, and vivifying." —Daniel Borzutzky
Sponsored by: John Ashbery Poetry Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Thursday, March 30, 2017
A Reading by John D'Agata
The controversial essayist presents a free public reading
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  6:00 pm
Thursday, March 30, at 6:00 p.m. in Bard Hall, game-changing essayist and editor John D'Agata reads in the Written Arts Series.

Introduced by Mary Caponegro '78, Richard B. Fisher Family Professor in Literature and Writing, and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

D'Agata is the author of Halls of Fame, The Lifespan of a Fact, About a Mountain, and the three-volume New History of the Essay series.

“John D'Agata is one of the most significant U.S. writers to emerge in the past few years. His essays combine the innovation and candor of David Shields and William Vollmann with the perception and concinnity and sheer aesthetic weight of Annie Dillard and Lewis Hyde. In nothing else recent is the compresence of shit and light that is America so vividly felt and evoked.” ―David Foster Wallace

"The Lifespan of a Fact is a Talmudically arranged account of the conflict between Jim Fingal, zealous checker, and John D’Agata, nonfiction fabulist." … "It is less a book than a knock-down, drag-out fight between two tenacious combatants, over questions of truth, belief, history, myth, memory and forgetting." —New York Times Book Review and Magazine

"In About a Mountain's circuitous, stylish investigation, D'Agata uses the federal government's highly controversial proposal to entomb the U.S.'s nuclear waste located in Yucca Mountain, near Las Vegas, as his way into a spiraling and subtle examination of the modern city, suicide, linguistics, Edvard Munch's The Scream, ecological and psychic degradation, and the gulf between information and knowledge. It is testament to D'Agata's skillful organization and his use of a rapid sequences of montages that readers will be pleasurably (and perhaps necessarily) disoriented but never distracted from the themes knitting together the ostensibly unrelated voices of Native American activists, politicians, geologists, Levi's parents, D'Agata's own mother, and a host of zany Las Vegans." —Publishers Weekly
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Tuesday, March 28, 2017
Student-Run Written Arts Feedback Group
For student writers of all creative genres, a student-run space to share work in progress and ask for feedback
Olin 304  8:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Are you looking for some honest peer feedback on your work? Come read and discuss student writing and snack in a low-pressure environment. All majors, years, and genres are welcome.

Those interested in getting feedback should bring at least a single reading copy of the work in question, or multiple copies (approx. 5–10) to share with others if desired.

This session marks the second of three Spring 2017 meetings of the Feedback Group. The group's last meeting takes place at 8pm on Tuesday, April 25.

Email Alex Adams (aa6851@bard.edu) with questions. 
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
  Tuesday, March 28, 2017
Michael Ives & Cole Heinowitz read in Poughkeepsie 03/28
Join the Process to Text reading series at Dutchess Community College for a free public poetry reading
Dutchess Community College / SUNY-Dutchess, Poughkeepsie  7:00 pm
At 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 28 at the Washington Art Gallery in the Allyn J. Washington Science and Arts Building (#1 on this map) at SUNY-Dutchess in Poughkeepsie, the Process to Text Series presents a free public reading by poets and Bard College faculty members Michael Ives and Cole Heinowitz. Light refreshments will be available, and copies of the authors' books may be on hand for sale and signing.

Contact Melanie Klein with questions: mklein@sunydutchess.edu.

 
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
  Wednesday, March 15, 2017
Open House with Poet G. C. Waldrep
Have a steamy hot tea or coffee with the poet in Shafer's waterfall lounge
Shafer House  10:30 am – 12:30 pm
The Written Arts program warmly invites all Bard students, faculty, and staff to stop by the downstairs lounge of Shafer House (at the Annandale Triangle, not the Toaster) between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 15, for hot drinks, snacks, and conversation.

Waldrep's books include Goldbeater's Skin, The Batteries, Disclamor, Archicembalo, Your Father on the Train of Ghosts, and Testament.
 PRAISE FOR ARCHICEMBALO
"Waldrep's title Archicembalo denotes an antique keyboard instrument with 24, or many more, keys per octave. Notoriously hard to play, such instruments made subtle and challenging music, with notes a conventional score could not include. Waldrep's sometimes bewildering, often exciting prose poems make their own unconventional music, replete with slippages, repetitions, suggestions." —New York Times Book Review

"G. C. Waldrep turns the prose poem upside down by focusing on what he knows best—music theory and history, which come to life is compact, language-driven texts.This setup explodes into visionary and audio linguistics that accompany the experience of encountering the poem while transforming the reader's senses into a fresh dimension of understanding."
Bloomsbury Review
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
  Monday, March 13, 2017
A Reading by G. C. Waldrep
The celebrated innovative poet reads from his work
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:30 pm
At 6:30 p.m. on Monday, March 13th, in the László Z. Bitó '60 Auditorium at the Reem-Kayden Center, the John Ashbery Poetry Series presents a reading by renowned poet G. C. Waldrep, author of such books as Goldbeater's Skin, The Batteries, Disclamor, Archicembalo, Your Father on the Train of Ghosts, and Testament.

Introduced by Ann Lauterbach and followed by a conversation and Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.
 PRAISE FOR ARCHICEMBALO
"Waldrep's title Archicembalo denotes an antique keyboard instrument with 24, or many more, keys per octave. Notoriously hard to play, such instruments made subtle and challenging music, with notes a conventional score could not include. Waldrep's sometimes bewildering, often exciting prose poems make their own unconventional music, replete with slippages, repetitions, suggestions." —New York Times Book Review

"G. C. Waldrep turns the prose poem upside down by focusing on what he knows best—music theory and history, which come to life is compact, language-driven texts.This setup explodes into visionary and audio linguistics that accompany the experience of encountering the poem while transforming the reader's senses into a fresh dimension of understanding."
Bloomsbury Review
 
PRAISE FOR TESTAMENT
 
"The poem repeatedly opens itself up, vents, releases, incurs more and varied content, and bears the marks of it all: the seams are everywhere; it is a poem of seams. The poem acts as an endless receipt of things heard, taken in, mistaken, distorted, fought, and believed in. In its utterly singular way, regardless of the dissonance it incurs along the way, Testament effects this reciprocity between the world within the poem and the poem within the world. Waldrep has given something wonderful: a poem whose testament can be trusted because it allows us to doubt." —Poetry Northwest
 
PRAISE FOR GOLDBEATER'S SKIN, winner of the Colorado Prize for Poetry
"The poetry of G. C. Waldrep is a prolific liturgy, intense and conversational by turns. And the turning is telling; it comes round right. Bright idioms become bright branches, and the branches become the further architecture of Word. Christopher Smart and Hart Crane applaud these poems in Heaven because the Earth of these poems is true." —Donald Revell
Sponsored by: John Ashbery Poetry Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Monday, March 13, 2017
A Reading by Robert Olen Butler
The Pulitzer Prize–winning author reads from his most recent novel, Perfume River
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm
On Monday, March 13, at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Robert Olen Butler reads from his new novel, Perfume River, the sequel to his Pulitzer Prize–winning fiction collection A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain. Sponsored by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by Bradford Morrow, and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

Butler is the author of sixteen novels, including Mr. Spaceman and Hell, and six fiction collections, including Tabloid Dreams. His stories have appeared widely in such periodicals as Conjunctions, The New Yorker, Esquire, Harper’s, The Atlantic Monthly, GQ, The Paris Review, VQR, and Granta; as well as in four annual editions of The Best American Short Stories, eight annual editions of New Stories from the South, and elsewhere.
 PRAISE FOR PERFUME RIVER
 “What I so like about Perfume River is its plainly-put elegance. Enough time has passed since Viet Nam that its grave human lessons and heartbreaks can be—with a measure of genius—almost simply stated. Butler’s novel is a model for this heartbreaking simplicity and grace.” —Richard Ford

“Butler’s Faulknerian shuttling back and forth across the decades has less to do with literary pyrotechnics than with cutting to the chase. Perfume River hits its marks with a high-stakes intensity. Butler’s prose is fluid, and his handling of his many time-shifts as lucid as it is urgent. His descriptive gifts don’t extend just to his characters’ traits or their Florida and New Orleans settings, but to the history he’s addressing.”—New York Times Book Review

“A deeply meditative reflection on aging and love, as seen through the prism of one family quietly torn asunder by the lingering effects of the Vietnam War. This is thoughtful, introspective fiction of the highest caliber, but it carries a definite edge, thanks to an insistent backbeat that generates suspense with the subtlest of brushstrokes.” —Booklist (starred review)

Any supporter who donates $500 or more to Bard’s literary journal Conjunctions receives a BackPage Pass providing VIP access to any Spring/Fall 2017 or future event in the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series. Have lunch with a visiting author, attend a seminar on their work, and receive premium seating at their reading. Or you can give your BackPage Pass to a lover of literature on your gift list! To find out more, click here or contact Micaela Morrissette at conjunctions@bard.edu or (845) 758-7054.
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Friday, March 10, 2017
IWT Curriculum Conversation: Lord of the Flies
An Allegorical Tale of Democracy and Survival
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  8:30 am – 4:30 pm
William Golding’s tale of schoolboys cast away on a Pacific island after a nuclear attack has inspired dystopias as disparate as The Hunger GamesThe Maze RunnerEnder’s Game, and Lost. Since the 1954 publication of The Lord of the Flies, this provocative story of children illustrates how quickly civility can revert to bloodthirsty savagery. The Lord of the Flies outlines the cruelties even “innocent” children will inflict when fear reigns. As one boy says: “Which is better—to have rules and agree, or to hunt and kill?” Such questions have spawned an industry of young-adult morality tales where child soldiers, child assassins, and child saviors battle it out for the survival of democracy—and of kindness, mercy, and love.

Why are such dark stories popular with young adults? How do they reflect the current views on politics, the economy, and the environment? What does The Lord of the Flies teach us about the roles young people can play in combating chaos, tyranny, and paranoia? This Curriculum Conversation will address these questions as we explore and grapple with a text that has engaged readers for generations.
 Registration Fee: $350, includes morning coffee, lunch, and anthology of related texts

Register by February 10, 2017 to receive the Early Bird Discount: $50 off registration fees

Groups of three or more teachers from a single institution receive an additional 10% discount off total workshop fees.

Visit writingandthinking.org to register, or call (845) 758-7484 with any questions and concerns.
Sponsored by: Institute for Writing and Thinking
Contact: Paloma Dooley  845-758-7484  pdooley@bard.edu
Thursday, March 9, 2017
Tea & a Reading with Eleni Sikélianòs
The two-time winner of the Gertrude Stein Award for Innovative American Writing meets with students and faculty and reads her poems
Shafer House and Bard Hall  3:30 pm – 7:00 pm
***Please note the corrected location information below. The late afternoon tea for Bard students, staff, and faculty takes place in Shafer House. Only the 6:00 p.m. public reading will be in Bard Hall.***

On Thursday, March 9th, the John Ashbery Poetry Series presents tea and a reading with Eleni Sikélianòs.

From 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Bard students and staff are warmly invited to stop by Shafer House (the Written Arts office building at the Annandale Triangle) to take tea and light refreshments with Sikélianòs.

At 6:00 p.m., Sikélianòs reads from her work in Bard Hall. Introduced by Ann Lauterbach and followed by a conversation and Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

Sikélianòs is the author of The Loving Detail of the Living & the Dead, Body Clock, The Book of Jon, The California Poem, The Monster Lives of Boys & Girls, Earliest Worlds, The Book of Tendons, and To Speak While Dreaming.

“In Make Yourself Happy, Eleni Sikélianòs evinces a neuro-psychological state counter to the miswrought biology that has haunted the Occident since the dawn of Roman times. These poems open the neurology to its whole participation in the psycho-physical field and are not unlike the seminal amplification of indigenous culture, where the language of the body simultaneously circulates with living metastates. These poems organically form as environmental respiration that only the poet can approach in the latter days of this techno-hypercritical epoch.”—Will Alexander

“Electric as a lightning storm, wild as a first-growth forest, protean as fantasy’s shape-shifters—that’s Sikélianòs’s poetry.” —Library Journal

“Eleni’s language—body-language, breath, and babies’ many minds behind—a poem that won’t let you go til it’s done with you, its sinuous whipping lines.” —Gary Snyder

The Book of Jon is a wonderful memoir, held together by string, rumor, glimpses of a father—and there is nothing like this father in literature—evoked toughly and with great love and above all art and craft. Both subject and author are unforgettable. We see a life approached informally from all sides and we read an obituary to die for.” —Michael Ondaatje
Sponsored by: John Ashbery Poetry Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Thursday, March 2, 2017
Student-Run Written Arts Feedback Group
For student writers of all creative genres, a student-run space to share work in progress and ask for feedback
Olin 304  8:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Are you looking for some honest peer feedback on your work? Come read and discuss student writing and snack in a low-pressure environment. All majors, years, and genres are welcome.

Those interested in getting feedback should bring at least a single reading copy of the work in question, or multiple copies (approx. 5–10) to share with others if desired.

Thursday's session marks the first of three Spring 2017 meetings of the Feedback Group. Subsequent meetings take place at 8pm on Tuesday, March 28, and Tuesday, April 25.

Email Alex Adams (aa6851@bard.edu) with questions. 
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Monday, February 27, 2017
Iberian Conversion and the Liberal Arts
Olin, Room 102  5:30 pm
Seth Kimmel
Assistant Professor of Latin and Iberian Cultures
Columbia University
 Diverse groups of lawyers, linguists, historians, and economists, among other communities of intellectuals, offered their opinions on the legitimacy and legacy of the early modern history of forced conversion to Christianity in the Iberian world. As I have argued in my recent book, Parables of Coercion (Chicago 2015), to participate in these debates about religious coercion and New Christian discipline was also to re-imagine the relationship among the scholarly disciplines themselves. Linking my book project to new research, my talk examines the late sixteenth-century taxonomies of knowledge that emerged from this particularly Iberian intellectual history and, more generally, the rhetoric of universality that characterizes the liberal arts in the early as well as the late modern periods.
Sponsored by: Religion Program, Division of Languages and Literature, LAIS Program, Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Tehseen Thaver  845-758-7207  tthaver@bard.edu
Monday, February 27, 2017
The Italians ... and the challenges of
writing about them
John Hooper, Italy correspondent of The Economist magazine and the author of The Italians (Viking, 2015 & 2016)
RKC 103  5:00 pm
How did a nation that spawned the Renaissance also produce the Mafia? What exactly is bella figura? And why do Romans eat their gnocchi on Thursdays? Having spent more than 15 years reporting on Italy, John Hooper set out to write a book that answers these and many of the other puzzles that confront outsiders in a society that can be as baffling as it is alluring.  The result is The Italians, published by Viking, which has featured in the bestseller lists of The Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times. In his talk, Hooper will discuss the challenges and rewards of trying to explain a society in which paradox is the norm and in which much is hidden, or coded or left unsaid.
Sponsored by: Division of Social Studies; Hannah Arendt Center; Historical Studies Program; Italian Studies Program; Literature Program
Contact: Joseph Luzzi  845-758-7150  jluzzi@bard.edu
Monday, February 27, 2017
A Reading by Francine Prose
The Rome Prize–winning author reads from her most recent novel, Mister Monkey
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm
On Monday, February 27, at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Francine Prose reads from her new novel, Mister Monkey. Sponsored by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by Bradford Morrow, and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

Bard College's visiting professor of literature and the former president of PEN American Center, Prose is the autor of many books, including Household Saints, Blue Angel, Reading Like a Writer, and Peggy Guggenheim: The Shock of the Modern.
 PRAISE FOR MISTER MONKEY
 “Expertly constructed, Mister Monkey is so fresh and new it’s almost giddy, almost impudent with originality. Tender and artful, a sophisticated satire, a gently spiritual celebration of life, a dark and thoroughly grim depiction of despair, a screwball comedy, a screwball tragedy, it’s gorgeous and bright and fun and multifaceted, carrying within it the geological force of the ages. It’s a book to be treasured. It’s that good. It’s that funny. It’s that sad. It’s that deceptive and deep.” —New York Times Book Review

“How does Prose do it? With precision, intelligence and wicked jocularity. She measures art in monkeys. She demands an evolution. This book hilariously swings through a backstage rank with hormones, ambition and an unforgettable cast of characters.” —Samantha Hunt, former Bard Fiction Prize winner

Any supporter who donates $500 or more to Bard’s literary journal Conjunctions receives a BackPage Pass providing VIP access to any Spring 2017 event in the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series. Have lunch with one of the three spring readers, attend a seminar on their work, and receive premium seating at their reading. Or you can give your BackPage Pass to a lover of literature on your holiday gift list! To find out more, click here or contact Micaela Morrissette at conjunctions@bard.edu or (845) 758-7054.
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Monday, February 20, 2017
Conversion, Memory, and the Limits of Early Islamic History
Olin, Room 102  5:30 pm
Travis Zadeh
Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
Yale University

This talk explores the cultural, linguistic, and mythological dimensions shaping religious conversion among Persians in the wake of the seventh-century Arab conquests. It further interrogates what this process of conversion reveals for the memory of early Islamic history and the spread of Islam along the eastern frontiers.
Sponsored by: Religion Program, Division of Languages and Literature, Historical Studies Program, Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Tehseen Thaver  845-758-7207  tthaver@bard.edu
  Tuesday, February 7, 2017
Running the from the Literary Past: The Case of Hebrew Literature
A conversation with Israeli-American Author, Ruby Namdar ("The Ruined House" - Winner of 2015 Sapir Prize, English translation due out in 2017) and Professor of Hebrew Literature Haim Weiss (Ben Gurion University of the Negev)
Olin LC 115  4:45 pm – 6:00 pm
This conversation, with a prize-winning Israeli-American novelist and a scholar of Hebrew literature, moderated by Shai Secunda (Bard, Religion and Jewish Studies) will consider universal literary themes of canon and breach, and reflect on the experience of trying to write a contemporary novel in a top-heavy literary tradition like Hebrew literature.
Sponsored by: Jewish Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Religion Program; Written Arts Program
Contact: Shai Secunda  845-758-7389  ssecunda@bard.edu