The Literature Program

Events+Lectures

The Literature Program

Upcoming Events

Past Events

                  

2015

Wednesday, December 9, 2015
EH Fall 2015 Share Event
RKC - Lobby, 100, 101, 107, & 111  4:30 pm
Students from Experimental Humanities classes across many disciplines—from “Introduction to Media” to “Small Screens” to “Mass Culture of Postwar Japan”—will share their projects, research and ideas from the semester.
Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Heidi Knoblauch  845-758-4385  hknoblau@bard.edu
Monday, December 7, 2015
The Dreams of Reason
by Alberto Manguel, Internationally Acclaimed Author
RKC 103  6:30 pm
Throughout the ages, writers have attempted to put into words the events that take place in dreams, and they have always failed. From the prophetic dreams in the Bible to Kafka's Metamorphosis, the resulting text, though masterful literary compositions, never seem to convey with verisimilitude the atmosphere and tone of dreams. Perhaps this ongoing failure tells us something about the nature of imagination and that of narrative, and about the hesitant links between both.
Sponsored by: Italian Studies Program; Literature Program
Contact: Joseph Luzzi  845-758-7150  jluzzi@bard.edu
Thursday, December 3, 2015
Release Reading for Conjunctions:65, Sleights of Hand: The Deception Issue
Contributors Porochista Khakpour, Laura van den Berg, and Gwyneth Merner read from their work in the fall issue at Book Culture
Book Culture, 536 W 112th St, NYC  7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
NEW YORK, NY—On Thursday, December 3rd, at 7:00 p.m., Book Culture (536 West 112th Street) will celebrate the release of Conjunctions' Fall 2015 issue on the theme of deception, Sleights of Hand, with readings by Porochista Khakpour, Laura van den Berg, and Gwyneth Merner, introduced by editor Bradford Morrow.

This event is free and open to the public. No tickets are required, but seating is first come, first served. To RSVP and share this reading with others, see the Facebook event page.

An internationally distributed magazine of provocative, risk-taking fiction, poetry, and narrative nonfiction, Conjunctions publishes fearless writing for dangerous readers. Work from Conjunctions can frequently be found in the Best American and Pushcart Prize anthologies and in Harper’s. The journal features contemporary masters such as Joyce Carol Oates, Edwidge Danticat, Russell Banks, Ann Lauterbach, and Jonathan Lethem; as well as astonishing new voices like Sequoia Nagamatsu, Chinelo Okparanta, Julia Elliott, and H. G. Carrillo.

As Karen Russell has said, "Conjunctions is a translation into a multiverse of stories and poems and essays and even weirder hybrid forms, the mutant menagerie of literary fiction. I read it with Christmas pleasure."

Book Culture is one of New York City's premier and essential independent sources for ideas and literary art. In addition to carrying a vast selection of spectacularly curated material, the store runs a thriving events series, including recent or upcoming discussions and readings featuring Joy Williams, Eileen Myles, Maggie Gyllenhall, Benjamin Moser, and many others.

To receive notifications of upcoming Conjunctions readings, book fairs, and other events in the metro area, follow the journal on Facebook and Twitter, or ask to be emailed about NYC events.

ABOUT THE READERS

Born in Tehran and raised in the Los Angeles area, POROCHISTA KHAKPOUR is the author of Sons and Other Flammable Objects (Grove Atlantic), a New York Times "Editor's Choice," Chicago Tribune "Fall's Best," and California Book Award winner. Her second novel, The Last Illusion (Bloomsbury), was called "a literary gem full of sadness, guts, and wonder" by Library Journal. In 2015, CCM will publish her children's book; and in 2017, Sick, a memoir of chronic illness and addiction, will appear from HarperPerennial.

One of today's most innovative and exciting new presences in fiction and other artforms, GWYNETH MERNER is a multi-disciplinary artist working in Western Massachusetts. A selection of her artists books is housed in the Special Collections Library at Washington University in St. Louis, and she is the recipient of the Nancy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Book Design. Her music is available from Bezoar Formations and is featured on Rhizomatic St. Louis, Volume 2 on the Close/Far label.

LAURA VAN DEN BERG is the 2014 recipient of the prestigious Bard Fiction Prize and an O. Henry Award. Her first collection of stories, What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us (Dzanc) was shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Award. Her second collection, The Isle of Youth (FSG), was named a "Best Book of 2013" by over a dozen venues, including NPR, The Boston Globe, and O, The Oprah Magazine. Of her first novel, Find Me (FSG), published this year, The Guardian said, "[It] lingers and aches in the memory."
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  conjunctions@bard.edu
Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Mining Your Search Results

Conducted by
Heidi Knoblauch, Digital Projects Coordinator
Collin Jennings, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in EH
Gretta Tritch Roman, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in EH

Henderson Annex 106  5:00 pm
In this workshop, participants will create network graphs of their JSTOR search results. We will build on a Python template to write a program that produces a network graph representing the co-occurring results across a series of search queries. These two types of computational methods will provide a new perspective on the manner in which search has become imbricated in our research practices and how new models of interdisciplinarity reflect the influence of search.
Sponsored by: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Heidi Knoblauch  845-758-4385  hknoblau@bard.edu
Monday, November 23, 2015
A Poetry Reading by Gracie Leavitt '07
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
The Bard alumna and author of Monkeys, Minor Planet, Average Star reads from her poems at 7:30 p.m., Monday, November 23rd, in Weis Cinema.

“Formidable vocabulary and cavalier jumps between subject matter are standard in Leavitt’s debut collection of postmodern pastorals. These are brainy poems where feats of syntactic contortion occur even on the microscopic level. Bouncing between abstract elements and tender emotions, Leavitt’s strength stems from her ability to operate simultaneously in different thematic spaces. The book unfolds as a cerebral pastiche where autobiography, clips from other texts, and personal conversations intersect. Leavitt demonstrates an uncanny ability to reveal how ‘a flower, a proposition, a noise/ can be imagined almost simultaneously.’” —Publishers Weekly

Introduced by Mary Caponegro and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Books will be available for sale and signing from Oblong Books & Music.

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Monday, November 23, 2015
"Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme":
The audacity of Paradise Lost
Lianne Habinek,
Assistant Professor of English,
Bard College

Fisher Center, Sosnoff Theater  4:45 pm – 6:15 pm
Paradise Lost is an epic poem par excellence — an experiment in blank verse which treats the Creation and Fall of mankind, the battle between good and evil, and the machinations of Satan, one the most compelling poetic characters ever written. Yet the poem is also unabashedly ambitious, claiming (winkingly) that it will accomplish “things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme,” not least of which is to reach back before the beginning of recorded Biblical history to be undeniably the first. What is at stake in this ambition? Could the real hero of this epic poem be its author himself?
Free and open to the public.
Sponsored by: First-Year Seminar
Contact: Cole Heinowitz  845-758-7203  heinowit@bard.edu
Sunday, November 22, 2015
A Birthday Reading by Robert Kelly
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
The poet Robert Kelly conducts his annual reading in honor of the birthday of his wife, the renowned translator Charlotte Mandell, on Sunday, November 22, 4:30 p.m. at Bard Hall. This event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

At Bard since 1961, Kelly is Asher B. Edelman Professor of Literature, the codirector of the Bard Written Arts Program, the founding director of the Writing Program of the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, and a contributing editor of Conjunctions.

Poet, fiction writer, playwright, and more, he has recently published his Collected Essays, edited by Pierre Joris and Peter Cockelbergh (Contra Mundum); Oedipus after Colonus and Other Plays (drcicerobooks); and Winter Music, texts to the photo work of Susan Quasha (T-space Editions). 

His many, many other books include The Common Shore, The Loom, Kill the Messenger, Not This Island Music, The Flowers of Unceasing Coincidence, A Strange Market, Red Actions, The Time of Voice, The Garden of Distances, Lapis, Runes, Threads, May Day. Fiction: A Transparent Tree, Doctor of Silence, Cat Scratch Fever, The Queen of Terrors, and The Book from the Sky.

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Thursday, November 19, 2015
Bard Student Fiction Reading
All students writers are welcome to share work with the group or just listen.
Shafer House  7:00 pm
In the second installment of a new series, any and all Bard students are warmly invited to join a fiction reading in the downstairs lounge of Shafer House (the Written Arts building) on Thursday, November 19th, at 7pm. Bring incomplete work, a sentence, a chapter, a paragraph, an idea, and share it! Or just come to listen to your peers' work and munch on the snacks provided. 

RSVP on Facebook or contact Cleo Egnal with questions. 
Sponsored by: Cleo Egnal; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Thursday, November 19, 2015
Sound Cluster meeting
Arendt Center  4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Monthly meeting of faculty interested in the practice or critical analysis of sound, sound technologies, soundscapes, listening.
Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Laura Kunreuther  845-758-7215  kunreuth@bard.edu
Wednesday, November 18, 2015
From the Balkan Mountains:
Folk Dance of Bulgaria and Macedonia
A Demonstration Class by Elissaveta Iordanova
Founder and Director, Gorana Dance of New York

At the Eastern European Music & Leisure Club, Blum Hall, 55 Blithewood Avenue  8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Bard students and community members welcome!

Come join us and dance!!!

Sponsored by: Dance Program; Literature Program; Russian/Eurasian Studies Program
Contact: Elizabeth Frank  frank@bard.edu
Tuesday, November 17, 2015
Scraping the New York Times

Conducted by
Heidi Knoblauch, Digital Projects Coordinator
Collin Jennings, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
in Experimental Humanities
and
Gretta Tritch Roman, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
in Experimental Humanities

Henderson Annex 106  5:00 pm
As part of the Search and Surveillance Workshop Series, we will learn how to use Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for web scraping. Our test case will be the New York Times API, which provides access to large amounts of article data with a single query. After retrieving data concerning topics that interest the participants, we will learn how to manage that data and perform basic text analysis tasks so that we can ask questions like, how has the language surrounding a given topic (say, climate change or marriage equality) changed over time? How does language differ across related but distinctive topics? What is the relationship between article frequency and search frequency concerning a topic over time?
Sponsored by: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Heidi Knoblauch  845-758-4385  hknoblau@bard.edu
Thursday, November 12, 2015
A Conjunctions Reading by Andrew Durbin, Paul La Farge, and Edie Meidav
KGB Bar, Manhattan  7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
NEW YORK, NY—At 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 12th, at KGB Bar in Manhattan (85 East 4th Street off 2nd Avenue), the provocative, innovative literary journal Conjunctions will hold a reading celebrating Behind the Book, a nonprofit organization that supports literacy and reading culture in underprivileged New York City public schools. Conjunctions contributors Paul La Farge, Edie Meidav, and Andrew Durbin will read from their work in the journal, and copies of their books will be auctioned to the audience, with all proceeds going directly to benefit Behind the Book's mission.

The reading is free and open to all; no tickets or reservations are required.

Published by Bard College, Conjunctions appears in a biannual print and e-book edition of fiction, poetry, and narrative nonfiction, and as a weekly online magazine of web-exclusive content. In its pages, contemporary masters meet radical new voices through the investigation of themes such as exile, erasure, obsession, doppelgängers, impossible realism, cinema, or dark comedy. It's a compilation of works that are at once feverishly imagined and immaculately executed, a space for reading dangerously.

Rick Moody declares, "Without a doubt, Conjunctions is the best literary magazine in America." And Joyce Carol Oates concurs: "If you like good reading that's also provocative and original, naturally you would be reading Conjunctions."

Copies of the brand-new Fall 2015 issue on the theme of deception, Conjunctions:65, Sleights of Hand, will be available for sale.

Behind the Book works with low-income students in first to twelfth grades, bringing authors into the classrooms and helping educators create curriculum-based programs that make for direct and sustained interaction between the children and the writer. In workshop fashion, students do original writing or create illustrated books, and all receive free copies of the authors’ books to keep as their own.  The organization has been raising awareness about children's literacy via its KGB reading series since 2006.

KGB is one of Manhattan’s defining spaces for both literature and liquor—New York Magazine says "KGB's reading series is legendary," while Publishers Weekly calls it "a beloved fixture of the New York literary scene." KGB hosts a wide variety of prominent authors, including, in Fall 2015, Eileen Myles, Elaine Equi, Alexandra Kleeman, M. T. Anderson, Fanny Howe, Christopher DeWeese, and many others.

PRAISE FOR THE READERS

ANDREW DURBIN is the author of several chapbooks and the full-length poetry collection Mature Themes (Nightboat), about which Hilton Als wrote: "This collection not only marks Durbin's brilliant present, it pulsates with realities and possibilities that indicate a radiant future." Kenning Editions will bring out his chapbook MacArthur Park this year, and Blonde Summer will be published in 2017. His poetry is included in this year's Greater New York exhibition at MoMA Ps1 and Performa.  Durbin is also a former senior editor with Conjunctions, coeditor of the indie press Wonder and editor of the anthology Future Perfect (BGSQD).  An excerpt from his Reveler appears in Conjunctions' online magazine.

PAUL LA FARGE’s novels include The Artist of the Missing (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), Haussmann, or the Distinction (Picador), and The Facts of Winter (McSweeney’s). His most recent book, Luminous Airplanes, was published by Picador in 2012 but continues in hypertextual form at luminousairplanes.com. Karen Russell is one of many readers to find his writing "brilliant, poignant, startling, hilarious." A recipient of the Bard Fiction Prize, La Farge's work has appeared in Conjunctions issues 34, 45, 53, and 55, as well as in the weekly online magazine.

"EDIE MEIDAV makes sentences perform like a snake-charmer's snakes," says Luc Sante, while Joanna Scott calls her "a fearless writer with a cosmic imagination." Meidav is the author of the novels The Far Field: A Novel of Ceylon (Houghton Mifflin/Mariner), Crawl Space (FSG/Picador), and Lola, California (FSG/Picador). Her Kingdom of the Young, a collection of short fiction with a nonfiction coda, comes out from Sarabande Books in 2017. A Bard Fiction Prize recipient and Conjunctions senior editor, her work has appeared in issues 41, 47, 50, 52, 59, 62, and 63, as well as in November's Sleights of Hand issue.

# # #

Sponsored by: Conjunctions
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  conjunctions@bard.edu
Tuesday, November 10, 2015
Olga Voronina, Assistant Professor of Russian

Letters to Véra, Vladimir Nabokov
(Ed. and transl. by Olga Voronina and Brian Boyd)

Introduction by Wyatt Mason, Writer in Residence

RKC 103  5:30 pm
Superbly edited by Olga Voronina and Brian Boyd, these letters reveal Nabokov as a considerable wit, with a gift for terse put-downs and fascination with what remained outside his class and culture – whether it was Greyhound buses in Massachusetts or the New York subway. Now, perhaps for the first time, the Russian writer emerges distinct from the shadows of his biographers, and as one of the most luxoriously besotted writers of all time.
Ian Thomson, “Letters to Véra by Vladimir Nabokov review –  scenes from a happy marriage,”
-The Observer, November 9, 2014
 “… this extraordinary and wonderful collection of letters to his wife restores to us as the virtuoso of prose. They are some of the most rapturous love letters anyone has ever written, love letters from the length of a lifelong marriage; beautiful performances for Véra, Nabokov’s wife, and incidentally for us. The publishers have immediately issued this volume as a Penguin Classic.
I don’t think we will quibble with that.”
Philip Hensher, “Nabokov’s Love Letters are Some of the Most Rapturous Ever Written,” -The Spectator, September 27, 2014

“…meticulously edited . . . Nabokov writing for his first and most important reader . . . this is Nabokov uncut. . . Nabokov comes on strong . . . some remarkable pen portraits…”
Duncan White, “Beauty out of the Banal,”
-Sunday Telegraph, September 21, 2014
Sponsored by: Literature Program
Contact: Literature Program  845-758-6822 
Monday, November 9, 2015
A Reading by Brian Evenson
The celebrated and controversial author of Altmann's TongueThe Wavering Knife, The Open Curtain, Last Days, Windeye, and other books reads from his work.
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations required.

"[Brian Evenson's stories] will thrill, unsettle, and captivate. Like lanterns in dark rooms, paper boats carried down on subterranean waters, they lead the reader into mysterious and perilous territory. Read at your own risk."—Kelly Link

"Brian Evenson is one of the treasures of American story writing, a true successor to the generation of Coover, Barthelme, Hawkes and Co., but also to Edgar Allan Poe." —Jonathan Lethem

"There is not a more intense, prolific, or apocalyptic writer of fiction in America than Brian Evenson." —George Saunders

A translator and literary theorist, BRIAN EVENSON is best known as the author of a dozen books that explore the horror genre through a sophisticated literary lens, frequently drawing on his personal history with the Mormon church. Most recently, he has published the fiction collection Windeye and the novel Immobility, both of which were finalists for a Shirley Jackson Award. His novel Last Days won the American Library Association's award for best horror novel, The Open Curtain was a finalist for an Edgar Award and an International Horror Guild Award, and The Wavering Knife won the IHG Award for best story collection.


 
Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Friday, November 6, 2015
The Bard Institute for Writing and Thinking Writer as Reader Workshops: Discovering New Ways into the Text
To Be Announced  9:00 am – 5:00 pm
IWT offers ten workshops that illustrate how writing supports close reading, engaged discussion, and better comprehension of commonly taught texts. See our website for workshop details: http://www.bard.edu/iwt/workshops/november/.
Sponsored by: Institute for Writing and Thinking
Contact: Autumn Seguin  845-758-7484  aseguin@bard.edu
Thursday, November 5, 2015
A Reading by Jennifer Moxley
The celebrated poet reads from her work
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
"The poems make room for thinking, for dreams, and for silence as they manage and contextualize space both public and private ... [They seem] to ask: Can we take the detritus of living and make song of it? What would that song be like? Would it be song? How do we begin to make it? What would stand in its way?" —Iowa Review

Introduced by Ann Lauterbach, Bard College's David and Ruth Schwab Professor of Languages and Literature, and followed by a Q&A, this event takes place in Bard Hall at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 5th. It is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

JENNIFER MOXLEY's many books of poetry and nonfiction include The Open Secret, There Are Things We Live Among: Essays on the Object World, Imagination Verses, Often Capital, The Line, Clampdown, and The Middle Room.

Sponsored by: John Ashbery Poetry Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Wednesday, November 4, 2015
Lianne Habinek
Assistant Professor of English
"Labor pains: William Harvey and the travails of conception"
Olin, Room 102  7:00 pm
Mentally, conception suggests the creation of a novel idea or understanding not previously accessible to the thinker.  Biological conception is of course likewise a creative act, resulting in the creation of a novel being.  The double meaning of conception is still very much alive in our language today, but this talk examines a moment in the seventeenth century when the word managed to forge a peculiar link between intellectual and biological processes, and between the very structures in which those processes took place – that is, an unexpected but highly productive link between the brain and the womb.  William Harvey, in a short and often-overlooked essay titled “On conception” (appended to his better-known work Experiments concerning animal generation), casts about for some means of explaining exactly how biological generation takes place in the absence of a clear motive force connecting sperm and egg in the womb.  He settles on the metaphorical concept of conception, which enables him to liken thought in the brain to the child in the womb, thereby associating the artistic act with the biological act.This talk shows that Harvey’s metaphor taps into the pulse of a broader association between brain and womb that flourished in a wide variety of discourses.  The womb-as-brain metaphor abounds in midwifery manuals, which worry constantly about the effect the mother’s imagination could have on the developing fetus: on a fairly benign level, if the mother craves strawberries, a strawberry-shaped birthmark could appear, but, more troublingly, maternal discontents might manifest monstrosities that exposed not only the mother’s disordered thinking but the problematics of the country in which she lives.  Conversely, the brain-as-womb metaphor served to elaborate upon the creative process, as writers (with much false modesty) describe the difficult gestation of their ideas and the laborious birth onto paper that resulted in the child-book being delivered into the hands of the reader.*Reception prior to the event beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the Olin Atrium
Sponsored by: Dean of the College
Contact: Office of the Dean of the College  845-758-7421  doc@bard.edu
  Monday, November 2, 2015
René Descartes: A life well hidden
by Daniel Berthold, Professor of Philosophy, Bard College
Fisher Center, Sosnoff Theater  4:45 pm – 6:15 pm
We are too easily misled by a common portrait of Descartes’ philosophy as a testimonial to the power of reason to achieve perfect clarity about the self, the world, and God. I will suggest that we can encounter a much more interesting Descartes if we see him as engaged in an inherently transgressive project.

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by: First-Year Seminar
Contact: Cole Heinowitz  845-758-7203  heinowit@bard.edu
Thursday, October 29, 2015
Enchanting the Desert: Visualizing the Production of Space at the Grand Canyon
by Nicholas Bauch, Geographer-in-Residence,
Stanford University

RKC 103  5:00 pm
Nicholas Bauch is Geographer-in-Residence at the Spatial History Project at Stanford University. He is a cultural geographer whose work brings digital techniques to bear on the art of landscape interpretation. He is author of A Geography of Digestion (forthcoming, University of California Press), and Enchanting the Desert (forthcoming, Stanford University Press). A recent experimental project is a kinetic sculpture he built called The Irreproducibility Machine. He holds a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Enchanting the Desert is a digital monograph based on a single historical document: a slideshow made by commercial photographer Henry G. Peabody between 1899-1930 at the Grand Canyon of Arizona. The project reconstructs Peabody’s slideshow in an interactive medium, allowing readers place the slides in a greater geographical context. The photographs are used to open up the expanse of the Grand Canyon itself, laying bare the European-American project of remaking this space, focusing on specific territories within the vast region to tell the story in a spatially organized narrative. When readers encounter this work, they can expect to uncover a pattern language that describes a new cultural becoming of this great landscape. Another layer on the palimpsest of meanings that have accrued here for nearly 10,000 years, the Euro-American experience of the Grand Canyon is yet an altogether new one. Using the established medium of the website application, Enchanting the Desert introduces a genre of scholarship: the born-digital interactive monograph. The medium allows for technical leaps impossible in a print publication. The genre takes advantage of these leaps by performing spatial narrative in an inventive new way.
Sponsored by: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Heidi Knoblauch  845-758-4385  hknoblau@bard.edu
Tuesday, October 27, 2015
Up From the Well: Recovering the Lost Legend of a Crusader and His Treasure
by Nicholas Paul, Associate Professor of History,
Fordham University

Olin, Room 204  5:00 pm
Professor Paul works on the world of the lay nobility in the central Middle Ages and the intersection between that world and the experience of crusading. In his first book, To Follow in Their Footsteps: The Crusades and Family Memory in the High Middle Ages (Cornell University Press, 2012), he examines how the crusades became part of the collective memory of medieval noble families in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. He has also co-edited Remembering the Crusades: Myth, Image, and Identity (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012). Professor Paul will be discussing his discovery of the hitherto-lost biography of the crusader Manasses of Hierges, the constable of the Kingdom of Jerusalem.

Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program; Literature Program; Medieval Studies Program
Contact: Karen Sullivan  845-758-7571  sullivan@bard.edu
  Monday, October 26, 2015
Columbia Publishing Course Information Session
Reem-Kayden Center  4:45 pm

Join Shaye Areheart, director of the Columbia Publishing Course and former VP & Publisher of Harmony Books (Random House), to learn about the multitude of career options in book, magazine, and digital media publishing. Hear about what you can do NOW to prepare for the publishing job market.

When: Monday, October 26, 4:45pm
Where: RKC 103
Led by: Shaye Arehart, Director, Columbia Publishing Course

Attendees will also learn more about the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism's Columbia Publishing Course, an intensive introduction to all aspects of book, magazine, and digital media publishing, from evaluations of manuscripts to the sales and marketing of finished products.

At CPC students learn directly from leaders in the industry--writers, editors, publishers, design directors, illustrators, advertising experts, and publicists. Geared to recent college graduates and culminating in a job fair, the course also includes extensive preparation for the job market. Recent graduates have landed at Penguin Random House, Simon & Schuster, Scholastic, GQ.com, Vice, Buzzfeed, and Slate.com.

For more information, please visit our website: http://www.journalism.columbia.edu/publishing

This event is co-sponsored by the Written Arts and Literature Programs, and the Career Development Office.



Sponsored by: Literature Program; Written Arts Program
Contact: Career Development Office  845-758-7539  cdo@bard.edu
Monday, October 26, 2015
A Reading by Joyce Carol Oates
Olin Hall  3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
The National Book Award winner, two-time Pulitzer nominee, and widely acclaimed fiction writer and essayist reads "Walking Wounded," an new, unpublished story specially commissioned for its world premiere at this event.

Introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations required.

Praise for Lovely, Dark, Deep

“Oates, one of few writers who achieves excellence in both the novel and the short story, has more than two dozen story collections to her name and she continues to inject new, ambushing power into the form. Oates’ stories seethe and blaze.” —Booklist

“With every new book Oates proves anew that she is perhaps our greatest contemporary American writer.” —Minneapolis Star Tribune

Praise for Carthage

“Knotted, tense, digressive and brilliant.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Joyce Carol Oates has outdone herself.” —NPR

“Brilliant … amazing. A compassionate tenderness suffuses the final sections of the book, as palpable as the cold irony with which the book begins. It’s a breathtaking effect.” —Washington Post

Praise for Evil Eye: Four Novellas of Love Gone Wrong

“An extraordinarily vivid depiction of lives gone awry ... A creepy, macabre thrill from start to finish. Terrific stuff.” —Independent

“Oates at her best—spare, swift, beautifully observed and quietly lethal.”—Times

Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, October 22, 2015
Does Literature Become More Relevant when We Incorporate History, Science, and Other Elements of Change?
A Talk by David Brin
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
National Endowment for the Humanities/Hannah Arendt Center Distinguished Visiting Fellow DAVID BRIN is a scientist who has served as a NASA visiting scholar in exobiology. As a writer of science fiction, he has received the Nebula award, two Hugo awards, and four Locus awards, and has published books including Earth and The Postman. He is also the author of The Transparent Society: Will Technology Force Us to Choose Between Freedom and Privacy?

This event takes place Thursday, October 22nd, at 4:30 p.m. in Bard Hall. It is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.


Sponsored by: Division of Languages and Literature; Hannah Arendt Center; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Tuesday, October 20, 2015
A Bestiary: An Evening of Text and Performance with Bradford Morrow and Alex Skolnick
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Novelist Bradford Morrow ("one of America's major literary voices" —Publishers Weekly) and musician Alex Skolnick ("one of the most remarkable guitarists in hard-rock history" —Guitar World Magazine) present a live collaborative performance of Morrow's lyrical prose pieces about animals real and imaginary—from Snake to Mongoose, Rooster to Bat, Unicorn to Whale, Elephant to Anenome. Set to Skolnick's innovative world music, this reading of A Bestiary unites voice with guitar virtuosity in unexpected, magical ways.

Conjunctions editor, Bard Center fellow, and Bard literature professor BRADFORD MORROW's many books of fiction include Trinity Fields, The Diviner's Tale, The Uninnocent, and The Forgers.

The latest albums from ALEX SKOLNICK, lead guitarist of the heavy-metal band Testament and the jazz group Alex Skolnick Trio, are Dark Roots of Earth and Planetary Coalition. He is a founding member of Metal Allegiance.

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program; the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Search and Surveillance with Python

Conducted by
Heidi Knoblauch, Digital Projects Coordinator
Collin Jennings, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
in Experimental Humanities
and
Gretta Tritch Roman, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
in Experimental Humanities

Henderson Annex 106  5:00 pm
As part of our workshop series “Search and Surveillance,” this workshop will lead participants through the process of setting up a programming environment suited for research projects that combine technical and critical material. We will install the Anaconda distribution of Python and Jupyter notebooks, which allow users to switch easily between text, code, and visualization in a dynamic interface. We will conclude the workshop by testing out this environment with data from Google Correlate, which provides information on search terms that tend to co-occur over time.

Sponsored by: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation ; Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Heidi Knoblauch  845-758-4385  hknoblau@bard.edu
  Monday, October 19, 2015
Religion, Self, and the Other in Ibn Tufayl’s
Hayy Ibn Yaqzan
by Tehseen Thaver, Assistant Professor of Religion,
Bard College

Fisher Center, Sosnoff Theater  4:45 pm – 6:15 pm
Hayy Ibn Yaqzan by Ibn Tufayl (d.1185 CE) represents one of the most enduring though often less appreciated texts in Muslim intellectual history. The themes of the nature of the self, reason, revelation, travel and knowledge that animate this text continue to be pressing issues of human concern. How can this text be situated in broader debates on self, reason and revelation in the Muslim tradition? In what ways do such discussions connect with comparative religious and spiritual knowledge traditions? Why and how is this text significant to the humanities and the liberal arts today? These are among the questions this presentation will seek to highlight and explore. Free and open to the public.
Sponsored by: First-Year Seminar
Contact: Cole Heinowitz  845-758-7203  heinowit@bard.edu
Thursday, October 15, 2015
A Reading by Carl Hancock Rux
The OBIE Award-winning playwright, novelist, and poet reads from The Exalted
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Carl Hancock Rux is the author of the novel Asphalt, the OBIE Award-winning play Talk, and the Village Voice Literary Prize-winning collection of poetry, Pagan Operetta.His work, which crosses the disciplines of poetry, theater, music, and literary fiction in order to achieve what one critic describes as a "dizzying oral artistry ... unleashing a torrent of paper bag poetry and post modern Hip-Bop music; the ritualistic blues of self awakening," is the subject of the Voices of America television documentary Carl Hancock Rux, Coming of Age

Introduced by Gideon Lester, the reading takes place October 15th at 7:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema and will be followed by a Q&A. The event is free and open to all; no tickets or advance reservations are required.

Rux is in residence with Live Arts Bard to rehearse a stage version of The Exalted, directed by Anne Bogart ‘74, which will have preview performances at the Fisher Center on October 16th and 17th at 7:30 p.m; find more details at fishercenter.bard.edu
Sponsored by: Fisher Center; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, October 8, 2015
A Reading by Anna Moschovakis
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
A founding editor of Ugly Duckling Presse, winner of the Academy of American Poets' James Laughlin Award, and author of I Have Not Been Able to Get Through to Everyone, You and Three Others Are Approaching a Lake, and the forthcoming They and We Will Get into Trouble for This reads from her work, introduced by Ann Lauterbach, Bard College's David and Ruth Schwab Professor of Languages and Literature.

This event takes place in Bard Hall at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 8th. It is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Books will be available for sale and signing from Oblong Books & Music.

ninth: a conversation between Annabot and the Human Machine on the subject of overpowering emotion

(Note: Though Annabot is ostensibly downloadable, the attempt to open her produced an error, a string of errors.)


ANNABOT: What now?


HUMAN MACHINE: The Brain, the brain—that is the seat of trouble!


ANNABOT: My brain, whose brain? Those who feel, feel.


HUMAN MACHINE: On the blink?


ANNABOT: Or, discipline. The brain is a machine of habit. The heart is a hell.


HUMAN MACHINE: “The secret of smooth living is a calm cheerfulness which will leave me always in full possession of my reasoning faculty.”


ANNABOT: But I am not cheerful.


HUMAN MACHINE: I ought to reflect, again and again, and yet again, that all others deserve from me as much sympathy as I give to myself. I place my hand over your heart.


ANNABOT: I cannot feel your hand.


HUMAN MACHINE: I cannot feel your heart.



This is the language of simple, obvious things

The conclusion and the part before



Anna held her hand out to feel the cold

It was cold



Then, nothing


PRAISE FOR ANNA MOSCHOVAKIS—
You and Three Others Are Approaching a Lake is easy-on-the-ear, accessible, wise, and funny, as when human Anna tells her imaginary robot counterpart things like, ‘human nature has changed since yesterday.’ She takes on the big questions by way of unusual details.” —Bookforum

“Moschovakis assualts materialism, waste, and the internet and repossesses elements of that culture in her poems—Craigslist ads, Wikipedia articles, and MySpace posts—in such a way that proves how demoralizing it can all be … [Readers will] appreciate her philosophically bent poetry, her austere use of language, and the sense of violence that charges her poems.”—San Francisco Bay Guardian

“Anna Moschovakis takes up the citizen’s task of thinking through political and existential issues relevant to lives lived in increasing dependence on internet access and globalization both. She performs the painful experience of the complicity with injustice that comes with citizenship—while lamenting colonization, opportunism, and capitalism, her poems search themselves for the common root of the urge toward empire. Ambitious and compassionate, her work believes—or hopes—that mindful attention to language might happily lead us elsewhere, toward other economies, other ways of being here together.” —Academy of American Poets

“Moschovakis shows us how it feels to want answers to certain kinds of questions, to see processes and seek causalities, and then get stuck in hermeneutic circles instead … You and Three Others Are Approaching a Lake feels like a book of erasures and extracts: mysterious, haunted, terse.”—The Nation

“[Moschovakis performs] a biting cultural study of our technological habits … a forced, and imperative, reconsideration of the world we inhabit and mindlessly exploit.”—Coldfront

"If history has been the history of systems that turn persons into functions (human machines), Moschovakis's poetry is a counter-system whose loving jokes and satiric repetitions reflood machinery with personhood."—Lana Turner

Sponsored by: John Ashbery Poetry Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Monday, October 5, 2015
A Talk by Financial Journalist and Editor Carol Loomis
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  4:45 pm – 5:45 pm
Carol Loomis inaugurates the John J. Curran '75 Lectures in Journalism Series, introduced by Wyatt Mason.

The venerated financial journalist Carol Loomis is the former senior editor-at-large of Fortune Magazine, and the coiner of the term "hedge fund." The editor of Warren Buffett's annual shareholder letter, she has been recognized by the New York Times for her success in battling gender stereotypes within the financial-services industry, having started her career in the 1950s as one of only two female reporters at Fortune. The Reformed Broker calls Loomis "a lion of financial journalism," while ValueWalk celebrates her as, "without doubt, the greatest business writer of all time."

John J. Curran '75 Lectures in Journalism honors the memory of a proud Bardian whose dedication to ethical reporting in journalism informed a trusting readership for over a quarter of a century and promoted a culture of honesty, integrity, and truth.


Sponsored by: Office of Development and Alumni/ae Affairs; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Monday, September 28, 2015
Suffering the Silence: Chronic Lyme Disease in an Age of Denial
A Reading by Allie Cashel '13
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
A living portrait of Chronic Lyme disease and its patients’ struggles for recognition and treatment, Suffering the Silence, originally Allie Cashel's senior project, is now a full-length memoir that details Cashel's own experience with Chronic Lyme and shares the stories of a number of other patients from around the world.

Born in London and raised in Westchester, NY, Allie was diagnosed with Lyme at age seven. Now a passionate advocate for increased awareness and reformed treatment of Chronic Lyme, she is the founder of sufferingthesilence.com, an online community for people living with chronic illness, and a member of the Jr. Board of the Tick Borne Disease Alliance.

Introduced by Mary Caponegro and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Copies of Suffering the Silence will be available for sale and signing from Oblong Books & Music.


Sponsored by: Biology Program; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, September 24, 2015
The New York State Writers Institute Celebrates Conjunctions
Bradford Morrow, Ann Lauterbach, and Peter Straub Read at SUNY-Albany
Recital Hall, Performing Arts, Center, SUNY-Albany, 1400 Washington Ave.  8:00 pm – 9:30 pm
On Thursday, September 24th, at 8:00 p.m., the prestigious New York State Writers Institute will celebrate Bard's provocative, innovative literary journal Conjunctions with a reading by Conjunctions editor Bradford Morrow (Bard literature professor and Bard Center Fellow) and contributing editors Ann Lauterbach (Bard's David and Ruth Schwab Professor of Languages and Literature) and Peter Straub.

The reading will take place at the Recital Hall at the Performing Arts Center on the University at Albany's uptown campus, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York. It is free and open to the public; no reservations or tickets are required. Copies of the readers' books and of Conjunctions will be available for sale.

***PRAISE FOR CONJUNCTIONS—"Conjunctions is a translation into a multiverse of stories and poems and essays and even weirder hybrid forms, the mutant menagerie of literary fiction. It's a place to take risks; a home in the universe for creative, dangerous writing; an oasis for weirdness and wonder. I read it with Christmas pleasure." —Karen Russell"Without a doubt, Conjunctions is the best literary magazine in America." —Rick Moody

"Eclectic, innovative, dazzling."—New York Today

"Striking ... rich." —New York Times

"A showplace for some of the most exciting and demanding writers now at work." —Washington Post

"Conjunctions is one of the very best literary magazines in North America. If you like good reading that's also provocative and original, naturally you would be reading Conjunctions." —Joyce Carol Oates "One of our most distinctive and valuable literary magazines. The fiction, poetry, criticism, drama, and art is sometimes described as ‘experimental,' but we would also say innovative, daring, indispensable, and beautiful." —PEN American Center  

PRAISE FOR BRADFORD MORROW—"One of America's major literary voices." —Publishers Weekly

"A distinguished American man of letters." —The Independent 
"Morrow's assiduous probing of the intricacies of moral choice hit us where we live—or ought to live." —The New York Times Book Review

PRAISE FOR ANN LAUTERBACH—"Lauterbach has found new forms for expressing the continuousness of change: its ways of summoning and disrupting intimacy, of evoking and subverting the position of perceptions and the framing and decentering play of language itself." —Boston Review

"Ann Lauterbach's poetry goes straight to the elastic, infinite core of time."—John Ashbery
PRAISE FOR PETER STRAUB—

"When Peter Straub turns on all his jets, no one in the scream factory can equal him. The plot is challenging, the characters are intriguing in their complexity and the language is a delight." —Stephen King

"Intense and yet measured; serious and melancholy at times, but also humorous. Straub's prose has a tart clarity that allows him to delineate the muddiness of life with great economy and richness. He has a superb ear for dialogue, both spoken and silent." —The Guardian
Sponsored by: Conjunctions
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Tuesday, September 22, 2015
A Reading by Norman Rush
The National Book Award winner and author of Whites, Mating, Mortals, and Subtle Bodies reads from his work.
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Introduced by Mona Simpson, this reading is free and open to the public. Books will be available for sale and signing from Oblong Books & Music.

Subtle Bodies seems like one of the few novels written for grown-up people. Rush’s characters want to fall in love, to laugh and enjoy themselves. Their quirks, opinions, compulsions, and the cruel or considerate ways in which they treat their rivals and allies are all aspects of the personalities that keep us engrossed—along with the clarity and precision of Rush’s sentences, the freshness of his observations, and our awareness that we are reading something quite rare: a remarkably nonjudgmental novel about people who are perpetually and often harshly judging themselves and one another.” —Francine Prose, The New York Review of Books

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, September 17, 2015
Bard Student Fiction Reading
All student writers are invited to bring and share work with the group, or just to come and listen
Shafer House  7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Any and all Bard students who write fiction are welcome to join a fiction reading in the downstairs lounge of Shafer House (the Written Arts Building) on Thursday, September 17th, at 7pm. Bring incomplete work, a sentence, a chapter, a paragraph, an idea, and share it! Or just come to listen to your peers' work.

RSVP on Facebook, or contact Cleo Egnal with questions.

Cookies will be provided. This marks the first of a semester-long series of student fiction readings.



Sponsored by: Cleo Egnal and Alex Hacker
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, September 10, 2015
City, Love, And Death
Writing in and on Berlin
Olin, Room 203  6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Reading and Discussion, in German and English With Berlin Writer and German National Book Award Nominee,  Michael WildenhainMichael Wildenhain’s eminent literary works are closely related to the city of Berlin. His more than twenty books of novels, short stories, poems, and plays address the historically layered grounds of what is now (again) Germany’s capital. His stories span from the Second World War to our contemporary period, with a particular focus on the 1970s and 1980s. This was the time when West Berlin was the stage for often violent confrontations between a young generation seeking social and political autonomy, and a state facing left-wing terror attacks while also showing a disturbing reluctance to address its national-socialist pastWildenhain was an activist in the Berlin squatters’ movement during those years. His dedication to fighting racism and other forms of injustice has shaped his political persona, and it has impacted his writings, not the least his compelling books for young adults.At Bard College, Michael Wildenhain will read from his current, unpublished prose work-in-progress (in German and English). He will also read from and discuss earlier works, including his award-winning novel The Smile of the Alligators (Das Lächeln der Alligatoren, 2015). Among the many literary awards Wildenhain has won are the prestigious Alfred-Döblin-Preis, the Tankred-Dorst Award for Film Scripts, and a Distinguished Fellowship at the German Academy in Rome.
Sponsored by: German Studies Program
Contact: Thomas Wild  845-758-7363  twild@bard.edu
  Friday, September 4, 2015
Post-Graduate Scholarships and Fellowships Information Session
Olin 102  12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Interested in applying for a Fulbright Scholarship, a Watson fellowship, or another postgraduate scholarship or fellowship? This information session will cover application procedures, deadlines, and suggestions for crafting a successful application. Applications will be due later this month, so be sure to attend one of the  two information sessions!
Contact: Carol Werner  845-758-7454  werner@bard.edu
  Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Writing Workshop at the Tivoli Library
A free support group and workshop for writers of any kind. Snacks, feedback, advice, solidarity.
Tivoli Free Library, Watts dePeyster Hall, 86 Broadway, Tivoli  5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
The writing group at the Tivoli Library meets the fourth Wednesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. All are welcome to show up and discuss the challenges and successes they're facing in their work with others. An additional upcoming session takes place July 22nd.

Sponsored by: Tivoli Free Library
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Wednesday, May 27, 2015
Writing Workshop at the Tivoli Library
A free support group and workshop for writers of any kind. Snacks, feedback, advice, solidarity.
Tivoli Free Library, Watts dePeyster Hall, 86 Broadway, Tivoli  5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
The writing group at the Tivoli Library meets the fourth Wednesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. All are welcome to show up and discuss the challenges and successes they're facing in their work with others. Additional upcoming sessions are June 24th and July 22nd.

Sponsored by: Tivoli Free Library
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Tuesday, May 19, 2015
Poetry Practicum Student Reading
The students of Ann Lauterbach's workshop, Poetry Practicum: How Forms Become Contents, present a reading of their work in the Shafer House library, May 19th, at 6:00 p.m.
Shafer House  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Come celebrate the end of the semester with words in performance! All are welcome.

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmoriss@bard.edu
  Thursday, May 14, 2015
Written Arts Senior Project Readings
Bard Written Arts students read from their senior projects at Weis Cinema, May 7th and 14th, 7:00 p.m.
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Please join the graduating seniors of the Program in Written Arts for the two celebratory nights of short readings from senior projects in fiction, poetry, essay, and unclassifiable forms!

MAY 7th READERS
Vladimir Nahitchevansky
Nicole Ouzounis
Sophie Browner
Najm Haq
Kristy Maier
Emily Parker
Phoebe Cramer
Nicola Goldberg

MAY 14th READERS
Martha Fearnley
Ariana Perez-Castells
Tina Wack
Emmett Shoemaker
Nina Hemmings
Theresa Holmes
Molly Livingston
Corinna Cape
Tenaya Nassar-Frederick
Tamzin Elliott
Mila Samdub
Yelena Alashkevich

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Wednesday, May 13, 2015
Experimental Humanities Share Event / Spring 2015
Reem-Kayden Center  5:00 pm
Students from Experimental Humanities classes across the college–ranging from “Media and Metropolis in Modern Japan” to “Art and the Internet”–will share their work in the form of presentations and exhibitions. All are welcome, and refreshments will be served!

Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Laura Kunreuther  kunreuth@bard.edu
Tuesday, May 12, 2015
Wordscape @ Clermont: A Poetry Trail & Community Art Project
Create texts to be hung trailside at the Clermont historic site during the month of June
Tivoli Free Library, Watts dePeyster Hall, 86 Broadway, Tivoli  5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Gather with other local writers and literature lovers at the Tivoli Free Library on Tuesday, May 12th to create short textual pieces that will be hung from the benches and gates along Clermont's poetry trail during the Wordscape festival!

To sign up for the writing sessions, stop by the library's front desk, call 845-757-3771, or email your name and phone number to tivoliprograms@gmail.com.


For questions about Clermont Wordscape in general, contact amcgrath@friendsofclermont.org or 518-537-6622.



Sponsored by: Friends of Clermont
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Thursday, May 7, 2015
Written Arts Senior Project Readings
Bard Written Arts students read from their senior projects at Weis Cinema, May 7th and 14th, 7:00 p.m.
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Please join the graduating seniors of the Program in Written Arts for the two celebratory nights of short readings from senior projects in fiction, poetry, essay, and unclassifiable forms!

MAY 7th READERS
Vladimir Nahitchevansky
Nicole Ouzounis
Sophie Browner
Najm Haq
Kristy Maier
Emily Parker
Phoebe Cramer
Nicola Goldberg

MAY 14th READERS
Martha Fearnley
Ariana Perez-Castells
Tina Wack
Emmett Shoemaker
Nina Hemmings
Theresa Holmes
Molly Livingston
Corinna Cape
Tenaya Nassar-Frederick
Tamzin Elliott
Mila Samdub
Yelena Alashkevich

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Wednesday, April 22, 2015
Writing Workshop at the Tivoli Library
A free support group and workshop for writers of any kind. Snacks, feedback, advice, solidarity.
Tivoli Free Library, Watts dePeyster Hall, 86 Broadway, Tivoli  5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
The writing group at the Tivoli Library meets the fourth Wednesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. All are welcome to show up and discuss the challenges and successes they're facing in their work with others. Additional upcoming sessions are May 27th, June 24th, and July 22nd.

Sponsored by: Tivoli Free Library
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Monday, April 20, 2015
A Reading by Jay Cantor
1989 MacArthur Fellow Jay Cantor reads from his new book, Forgiving the Angel: Four Stories for Franz Kafka.
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Introduced by Bradford Morrow, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations required.

"These fluently empathic, mordantly ironic, and unflinching stories of love, dissent, torture, and sacrifice carry forward Kafka’s eviscerating vision and affirm Cantor’s standing as a virtuoso writer of conscience." —Booklist
 
“Forgiving the Angel links disparate time, places and characters in an ingeniously unified and admirably purposeful fiction. [In its] formal circularity, ethical ambiguity and scrupulous undecidability, Cantor’s fiction is a worthy homage to Kafka. It is also an original work that pulls our mind through the kind of biographical and historical contraption that Kafka would probably never have put together, would probably not, as a Jew in Czechoslovakia, have survived to put together.”—New York Times Book Review

“Four evocative, ambitious, and highly varied tales aim to bring Kafka back to us by showing that he never left. Instead, he haunts everyone and everything he touches … Cantor creates gripping stories around innumerable epistolary and biographical artifacts … Superb.” —Slate
 
“This fictional tribute to the life and work of Franz Kafka follows in the vein of Cantor’s previous works of fiction … all of which use familiar figures and true events as a springboard for offbeat and psychologically incisive storytelling. The four stories here center on real figures in Kafka’s life … The writer himself is a distant but powerful force in the stories, a Kafkaesque presence haunting his own legacy.” —New Yorker

JAY CANTOR is the author of three novels, The Death of Che Guevara, Krazy Kat, and Great Neck; and two books of essays, The Space Between and On Giving Birth to One’s Own Mother. He is the recipient of a 1989 MacArthur Fellowship, or "Genius Grant."

Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Friday, April 17, 2015
All Bard Writers Are Invited to Read with Hoot Fisher at Taste Budd's Story Slam
Taste Budd's, Red Hook  7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Taste Budd's Café in Red Hook presents Story Slam, a monthly literary event dedicated to the complementary traditions of the written and spoken word, featuring storytellers—published and unpublished—from the Hudson Valley and beyond.

This Friday, April 17th, at 7 p.m., hear Bard student Hoot Fisher share his poetry. All are welcome to attend, or to read with Hoot. Those who wish to read should be there by 6:15pm.

Want to be part of an upcoming Story Slam? Email Dara Lurie at storytellers@tastebudds.com.


Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 14, 2015
Reading and Writing with Bard Fiction Prize Writer in Residence Laura van den Berg
Two Boots  7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
All Bard writers and readers are invited to meet with Laura van den Berg, this year's Bard Fiction Prize winner and Spring 2015 writer in residence, at Two Boots on Tuesday, April 14th, 7:00 p.m.

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Sunday, April 12, 2015
A Reading by Rabih Alameddine
The 2014 National Book Award finalist Rabih Alameddine reads from his work.
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Rabih Alameddine is the author of the story collection The Perv and the novels Koolaids; I, the Divine; The Hakawati; and, most recently, An Unnecessary Woman, a finalist for the 2014 National Book Award. He divides his time between San Francisco and Beirut.

An Unnecessary Woman dramatizes a wonderful mind at play. The mind belongs to the protagonist, and it is filled with intelligence, sharpness and strange memories and regrets. But, as in the work of Calvino and Borges, the mind is also that of the writer, the arch-creator. His tone is ironic and knowing; he is fascinated by the relationship between life and books. He is a great phrase-maker and a brilliant writer of sentences. And over all this fiercely original act of creation is the sky of Beirut throwing down a light which is both comic and tragic, alert to its own history and to its mythology, guarding over human frailty and the idea of the written word with love and wit and understanding and a rare sort of wisdom.—Colm Tóibín
Introduced by Mary Caponegro and followed by a Q&A, this reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Copies of An Unnecessary Woman will be available for sale and signing by Oblong Books & Music.
Sponsored by: Difference and Media Project; Middle Eastern Studies Program; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, April 2, 2015
"Beethoven and the Radio"
A lecture by Dr. Daniel Chua, head of the School of Humanities, Hong Kong University, and currently Visiting Professor of Music History at Yale University
N217, Edith C. Blum Music Institute  4:30 pm
Daniel K. L. Chua earned his doctorate in musicology from the University of Cambridge and is currently professor of music at the University of Hong Kong, where he heads the School of Humanities. He was previously a fellow and the director of studies at St John’s College, Cambridge, and professor of music theory and analysis at King’s College, London. Professor Chua was a Henry Fellow at Harvard and is the recipient of the 2004 Royal Musical Association’s Dent Medal. He has written widely on music, from Monteverdi to Stravinsky; his publications include The “Galitzin” Quartets of Beethoven (Princeton, 1995), Absolute Music and the Construction of Meaning (Cambridge, 1999), “Rioting with Stravinsky: A Particular Analysis of the Rite of Spring” (in Musical Analysis, 2007), “Beethoven’s Other Humanism” (in Journal of the American Musicological Society, 2009), and “Listening to the Self: The Shawshank Redemption and the Technology of Music” (in 19th-Century Music, 2011). He is currently working on a monograph entitled “Beethoven and Freedom.”

Sponsored by: Bard College Conservatory of Music; Music Program
Contact: Conservatory Concert Office  845-758-7196  conservatoryconcerts@bard.edu
Thursday, March 26, 2015
Conjunctions: 25 Years at Bard
Olin Hall  7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Bard celebrates its twenty-fifth year as publisher of the renowned literary journal Conjunctions with a special reading featuring Conjunctions contributors and editors and Bard faculty members Mary Caponegro, Benjamin Hale, Robert Kelly, Ann Lauterbach, Bradford Morrow, and Francine Prose.

Note that Neil Gaiman regrets that he will not be able to participate as previously announced.

The preeminent source for the best in innovative, provocative fiction, poetry, and narrative nonfiction, Conjunctions is edited by Bradford Morrow, Bard Center Fellow and professor of literature, and the winner of the PEN/Nora Magid Award for editorial excellence. The anniversary is also marked by a special exhibition at Stevenson Library.

The reading takes place March 26 at 7pm in Olin Hall and is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.


Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Reading and Writing with Bard Fiction Prize Writer in Residence Laura van den Berg
Two Boots  7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
All Bard writers and readers are invited to meet with Laura van den Berg, this year's Bard Fiction Prize winner and Spring 2015 writer in residence, at Two Boots on Wednesday, March 25th to discuss Amelia Gray’s recent story in The New Yorker, “Labyrinth.”
 
The story can be found online at http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/02/16/labyrinth-4.
 
There is also an interview with Gray about the story here: http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/fiction-this-week-amelia-gray-2015-02-16.
 
You are encouraged to read the story and interview (they’re both short!) beforehand, but since the conversation will also extend to what we’re reading and writing, you’re very welcome to come even if you don’t have a chance to read in advance.

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Monday, March 23, 2015
Postcoloniality & the After-life of
Indian Writing in English
Manisha Basu,
University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Preston  12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
After the glittering success in the global literary bazaar of Indian writers in English like Salman Rushdie, Amitav Ghosh, and Arundhati Roy, who are the scribes claiming to have inherited the legacy of Indo-English writing in the new millennium? In what ways do writers like Chetan Bhagat and Amish Tripathi put under erasure the idea of India as a postcolonial nation in order to distinguish themselves from their illustrious forebears and pose as the harbingers of a millennial generation of Indian-English narratives? Does their violently nationalist attack on the politics of postcoloniality mean that their work ought no longer be the subject of postcolonial criticism? Would it be more productive, in reading figures like Bhagat and Tripathi, to shift the terms of discussion and speak in terms of Global Anglophone literatures or World Literatures, rather than Postcolonial literatures? I will attempt to open up such questions with a view to understanding what is to be gained and what lost in privileging any one of these categories to the neglect of the others—especially in in a world order where the fruits of neo-liberal globalization have most spectacularly crystallized in a continuum of metropolitan centers like Shanghai, New Delhi, Mumbai, and Lagos rather than in any one national context. In closing, I will also propose that a very careful comparative analysis, not only of the literatures produced in the making of such metropolitan centers, but also of the politics of metropolitanization itself,is what is needed to throw into relief the stakes involved in reconfiguring the pressures of postcolonial criticism.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Literature Program
Contact: Deirdre d'Albertis  dalberti@bard.edu
Friday, March 13, 2015
Reading and Writing with Bard Fiction Prize Writer in Residence Laura van den Berg
Two Boots  7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
All Bard writers and readers are invited to meet with Laura van den Berg, this year's Bard Fiction Prize winner and Spring 2015 writer in residence, at Two Boots on March 13 for a pre–spring break informal discussion the literature you're consuming and/or producing these days.

Laura will meet with Bardians again on March 25 to talk about Amelia Gray's "Labyrinth."

Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Wednesday, March 11, 2015
Web Accessibility: A Portable Toolkit
Stephanie Rosen, The University of Texas at Austin
RKC 100  3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
This hands-on workshop introduces the basics of web accessibility, a movement committed to creating online resources accessible to all. Participants will become familiar with guidelines and best practices for making web content operable for diverse users, including those with disabilities who use assistive technologies. Utilizing web-based tools, attendees will practice assessing the accessibility of sites they use everyday. Following our workshop, participants will leave with strategies for improving the accessibility of digital content they produce.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Experimental Humanities Program; Literature Program
Contact: Maria Sachiko Cecire  845-758-7697  mcecire@bard.edu
  Thursday, March 5, 2015
Around Jacques Rancière
Soirée Jacques Rancière
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
The French Program presents an evening devoted to Jacques Rancière.  Patrick Bray (Ohio State University) will present  ""Rancière, Aesthetics, and the Birth of Literature," Margaret Flynn (Ohio State University) "A Rancierian Fable," and Marina van Zuylen (Bard College) "Rancière, critic of Bourdieu" RKC 103
Sponsored by: French Studies Program
Contact: Marina Van Zuylen  845-758-7381  vanzuyle@bard.edu
Wednesday, March 4, 2015
Tchac-tchac, slosh, lub-dub: Imagining the Sounds of Collecting Clinical Photographs
Heidi Knoblauch, Yale University
RKC 100  3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
What would collecting medical photographs sound like in the nineteenth century? In this hands-on workshop, participants will learn how to use Audacity to compile short sound clips imagining the sounds of taking and collecting patient photographs. This use of twenty-first century audio technologies will help us understand how nineteenth century photographic technologies mediated the doctor-patient relationship.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Experimental Humanities Program; Literature Program
Contact: Maria Sachiko Cecire  845-758-7697  mcecire@bard.edu
Monday, March 2, 2015
A Reading by Lily Tuck
The National Book Award–winning author of The News from Paraguay, Siam, I Married You for Happiness, and other books of fiction and biography reads from her work.
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Introduced by Bradford Morrow, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations required.

"Tuck is a genius with moments … Her ability to capture beauty will remind readers of Margaret Yourcenar and Marguerite Duras." —Los Angeles Book Review

Born in Paris, LILY TUCK is the author of four previous novels: Interviewing Matisse, or the Woman Who Died Standing Up; The Woman Who Walked on Water; Siam, or the Woman Who Shot a Man, which was nominated for the 2000 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction; and The News from Paraguay, winner of the National Book Award. She is also the author of the biography Woman of Rome: A Life of Elsa Morante. Her short stories have appeared in The New Yorker and are collected in Limbo and Other Places I Have Lived.

Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Monday, March 2, 2015 – Thursday, April 2, 2015
Read Dangerously / Write Fearlessly
Bard Celebrates Conjunctions
Stevenson Library  In celebration of the 25th anniversary of the publishing partnership between Bard and the innovative literary journal Conjunctions, the Stevenson Library presents a special exhibition of issues and ephemera from the journal's archive, including artwork by Brice Marden and Francesco Clemente, the first publication of material from David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest (with a never-reprinted introduction by the author), unpublished cover mock-ups, and more.
Sponsored by: Stevenson Library
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  conjunctions@bard.edu
Thursday, February 26, 2015
Screen Relations: Do Bodies Matter?
Gillian Isaacs Russell, Ph.D.
British Psychoanalytical Council
British Psychotherapy Foundation

Campus Center, Weis Cinema  4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
As we turn toward technology to mediate all types of relational connection many psychotherapists are enthusiastically embracing computer-mediated treatment. Ironically, this land rush towards “screen relations” based treatment comes at the very time when leading researchers on how technology shapes relationships are voicing serious concerns about the damage technological mediation does to both intimate connection and reflective solitude. Do therapeutic couples need the traditional experience of presence and not just technologically simulated presence to deepen psychoanalytic process? Gillian Isaacs Russell will explore this question through the lens of informatics, neuroscience, infant development, and psychoanalysis. In view of the current state of communication technology and the fact that we have evolved to relate as bodies together, it will be argued that we need to experience presence in a shared environment to “keep it real.”  Discussion will be encouraged (embodied and unmediated!) about the clinical--and global-- implications of bodies being together and apart.

Free and Open to the Public


Sponsored by: Literature Program
Contact: Deirdre d'Albertis  845-758-7242  dalberti@bard.edu
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
Input/Output: Investigating Data-driven Scholarship in the Humanities
Amanda Licastro
CUNY Graduate Center

RKC 100  3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
This hands-on workshop begins with a presentation that showcases examples of digital humanities (DH) projects from the perspective of the principal investigator, demonstrating how they are conceived, constructed, maintained, and theorized. This will be followed by a “reverse engineering” workshop (via Miriam Posner’s “How Did They Make That”) which will lead participants through the process of deconstructing existing DH projects to understand how they were built, what purpose they serve, and how successful they are in their current state. For this workshop we will be paying specific attention to the kinds of data used and how that data was manipulated in order to be readable by both machines and humans. Data management is at the core of digital humanities methodology, and investigating the types of data we use as humanists will lead us to the larger questions of how to engage with and assess digital work.

Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Experimental Humanities Program; Literature Program
Contact: Maria Sachiko Cecire  845-758-7697  mcecire@bard.edu
  Tuesday, February 24, 2015
CANCELLED: 
Frantz Fanon's Clinic
Azeen Khan, Duke University
RKC 101  CANCELLED
Frantz Fanon is often regarded as an important figure in critical and postcolonial theory, addressing questions of revolutionary violence, racial difference, and colonialism. This paper considers Fanon’s political writings alongside his clinical work, most of which he conducted at the Psychiatric hospital at Blida-Joinville in Algeria between 1953-1956. The paper stages an encounter between the “political” and “clinical” aspects of Fanon’s work to suggest how the clinic emerges as a site of the political in postcolonial studies. In particular, it looks to the way in which the shadow of Fanon’s clinic falls on the theorization on violence, torture, sexuality, and the psyche in postcolonial literary texts.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Literature Program
Contact:
  Monday, February 23, 2015
Columbia Publishing Course Information Session
Olin Language Center, Room 115  4:45 pm

Join Shaye Areheart, director of the Columbia Publishing Course and former VP & Publisher of Harmony Books (Random House), to learn about the multitude of career options in book, magazine, and digital media publishing. Hear about what you can do NOW to prepare for the publishing job market.

When: Monday, February 23, 4:45pm
Where: Olin LC 115
Led by: Shaye Arehart, Director, Columbia Publishing Course

Attendees will also learn more about the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism's Columbia Publishing Course, an intensive introduction to all aspects of book, magazine, and digital media publishing, from evaluations of manuscripts to the sales and marketing of finished products.

At CPC students learn directly from leaders in the industry--writers, editors, publishers, design directors, illustrators, advertising experts, and publicists. Geared to recent college graduates and culminating in a job fair, the course also includes extensive preparation for the job market. Recent graduates have landed at Penguin Random House, Simon & Schuster, Scholastic, GQ.com, Vice, Buzzfeed, and Slate.com.

The Columbia Publishing Course is accepting applications for the 2015 session (June 14-July 24) through March 9. For more information, please visit our website (http://www.journalism.columbia.edu/publishing).

This event is co-sponsored by the Written Arts and Literature Programs, and the Career Development Office.



Sponsored by: Literature Program; Written Arts Program
Contact: Career Development Office  845-758-7539  cdo@bard.edu
  Thursday, February 19, 2015
How Far Away is the South Bronx?
Peter L'Official, Harvard University
Olin, Room 102  12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
In the 1970s and 1980s, images of the Bronx’s burned and abandoned buildings and the open expanses of rubble surrounding them dominated the iconography of urban ruin—so much so that the words “South Bronx” became, for a time, synonymous with urbanism’s failures. Such images served to further alienate an American public that was already estranged from many of its urban centers, and transformed the South Bronx into a trope for urban decay. To many Americans, the Bronx may well have been another country. Yet the literal place called the South Bronx was also home to 600,000 residents, largely African American and Latino, even during its worst days. This lecture discusses some of the many representations of the Bronx before settling upon a set of photographic representations, one the product of professional photographers and the other the product of the municipal government—New York City’s tax department—that, when examined together, help reclaim the narratives of Bronx residents from the realm of myth and stand as testament to the life that endured among the ruins. These photographic representations form an essential and understudied bridge between the era’s African American vernacular and literary traditions—which themselves are inherently interdisciplinary—and more literary representations of urban ruin writ large.
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Dean of the College; Literature Program
Contact: Christian Ayne Crouch  crouch@bard.edu
  Thursday, February 12, 2015
Fantasy and the Archive in the “Afric-American Picture Gallery”

Britt Rusert, University of Massachusetts


Olin, Room 102  12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
In 1859, a series of fictional sketches, unprecedented in the history of African American literature, appeared in the pages of the Anglo-African Magazine. Written under the pen name “Ethiop,” William J. Wilson’s “Afric-American Picture Gallery” offered readers a textual tour of a fictional gallery of art on various subjects related to black life in America. Drawn from real-life paintings, works imagined by the author, and portraits that appeared in the antebellum print sphere, Wilson’s Picture Gallery effectively imagines the first gallery of black art in the United States. In addition to offering an introduction to this fascinating, yet virtually unknown text, this talk will explore the relationship between fantasy and the archive in the Picture Gallery, and how, more specifically, fantasy allows Wilson to critically reflect on the problem of the archive in the contexts of slavery and nominal freedom. I will also discuss a collaborative project, currently underway, to create a digital edition and virtual installation of the Picture Gallery.
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Dean of the College; Literature Program
Contact: Christian Ayne Crouch  crouch@bard.edu
  Tuesday, February 10, 2015
'In the Paper as On the Platform': Frederick Douglass in Print and in Person.
Alex W. Black, Rutgers University
Olin, Room 102  12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Scholars increasingly look to Frederick Douglass’s 1855 My Bondage and My Freedom to trace his changing politics and artistry. Though numerous studies have now taken up Douglass’s “Life as a Slave” and “Life as a Freeman”—the titles of the autobiography’s two parts—none have treated at any length the appendix that closes the volume, even though it is as long as, if not longer than, “Life as a Freeman.” The appendix, which collects extracts from his writings (most of them speeches), is not merely meant to provide a retrospective of his work. Douglass used the appendix to continue, rather than just catalog, that work. This talk will relate Douglass's autobiographical writing to his other work (e.g., editorial, oratorical) from the 1840s and 1850s. In the process, it will show that he participated in what scholars of nineteenth-century America have called a "culture of reprinting," as well as reenacting.

Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Dean of the College; Literature Program
Contact: Christian Ayne Crouch  crouch@bard.edu
  Thursday, February 5, 2015
“Serial Pan-Africanism in the African Times and Orient Review (1912-1918)

*Location changed to Olin LC 120*
Marina Bilbija, Harvard College Fellow
OLIN LC 120  4:45 pm – 5:45 pm
“Serial Pan-Africanism in the African Times and Orient Review (1912-191),” comes from the second chapter of my book project, entitled Worlds of Color: Black Internationalism and the Periodical in the Age of Empire. In this chapter I excavate the shared history of early pan-Africanism and pan-Islamism through readings of the first self-professed Pan-African and Pan-Islamic journal, the London-based The African Times and Orient Review (1912-1919). By jointly addressing African and Asian, Muslim, Hindu and Christian readerships, this journal constructed new maps of belonging for its readers and offered nuanced analytics for understanding the shared genealogies of anti-Black racism and Orientalism in the Anglophone world. I mine the archives of this eclipsed strain of Pan-Africanism for a much-needed vocabulary for studying the chiasmic relationship between race and religion.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Literature Program
Contact: Deirdre d'Albertis  845-758-6822  dalberti@bard.edu
Monday, January 26, 2015
CANCELED: A Reading by Norman Rush
The Norman Rush reading originally scheduled for January 26 has been canceled. This event will be rescheduled soon.
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The National Book Award winner and author of Whites, Mating, Mortals, and Subtle Bodies reads from his work Monday, January 26, at 6:00 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center.

Introduced by Mona Simpson, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations required.

“Subtle Bodies seems like one of the few novels written for grown-up people. Rush’s characters want to fall in love, to laugh and enjoy themselves. Their quirks, opinions, compulsions, and the cruel or considerate ways in which they treat their rivals and allies are all aspects of the personalities that keep us engrossed—along with the clarity and precision of Rush’s sentences, the freshness of his observations, and our awareness that we are reading something quite rare: a remarkably nonjudgmental novel about people who are perpetually and often harshly judging themselves and one another.”—Francine Prose, The New York Review of Books
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu