The Literature Program

Events+Lectures

The Literature Program

Upcoming Events

Past Events

                  

2016

Tuesday, November 29, 2016
From the Streets of Paris and London
to a Cellar in St. Petersburg:
How Russians' European Travel
Informs Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground
Charles Arndt III, Vassar College
RKC 101  5:30 pm
Charles Arndt III is an Assistant Professor of Russian Language and Literature at Vassar College. After defending his PhD dissertation “Dostoevsky’s Engagement of Russian Intellectuals in the Question of Russia and Europe: From Winter Notes on Summer Impressions to The Devils” at Brown University, he has written articles on Dostoevsky’s literary relationship to the work and persona of Nikolai Karamzin and Denis Fonvizin, on the novelist’s use of everyday objects in descriptions of fantastical events, and on religious wandering (strannichestvo) in Dostoevsky’s novel The Adolescent. Professor Arndt has also explored and written on religious wanderers as a theme in the works of several other nineteenth-century Russian authors and has produced an article on Nikolai Leskov’s use of hagiographical devices. He is deeply interested in the inclusion of mythological space in descriptions of wanderers in Russian nineteenth-century literature.
Sponsored by: Russian/Eurasian Studies Program
Contact: Olga Voronina  845-758-7391  ovoronin@bard.edu
Sunday, November 20, 2016
A Birthday Reading by Robert Kelly
Bard Hall, Bard College Campus  3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
The poet Robert Kelly conducts his annual reading in honor of the birthday of his wife, the renowned translator Charlotte Mandell, on Sunday, November 20, at 3:00 p.m. in Bard Hall. This event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

At Bard since 1961, Kelly is Asher B. Edelman Professor of Literature, the codirector of the Bard Written Arts Program, the founding director of the Writing Program of the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, and a contributing editor of Conjunctions.

Poet, fiction writer, playwright, and more, he has recently published his Collected Essays, edited by Pierre Joris and Peter Cockelbergh (Contra Mundum); Oedipus after Colonus and Other Plays (drcicerobooks); and Winter Music, texts to the photo work of Susan Quasha (T-space Editions). 

His many, many other books include The Common Shore, The Loom, Kill the Messenger, Not This Island Music, The Flowers of Unceasing Coincidence, A Strange Market, Red Actions, The Time of Voice, The Garden of Distances, Lapis, Runes, Threads, May Day. Fiction: A Transparent Tree, Doctor of Silence, Cat Scratch Fever, The Queen of Terrors, and The Book from the Sky.

"In more than thirty-five collections of poetry, Kelly has utterly failed at one thing: to pigeonhole himself into predictability. Red Actions: Selected Poems 1960–1993 contains imagistic bits that seem like fragments of poetic tapestry, long surreal narratives, series poems, and sonorous chants. Whatever the form, they are marked by Kelly's erudition, which covers Greek archaeology as readily as twentieth-century music, Sumerian gods as well as contemporary painting." —Booklist
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Wednesday, November 16, 2016
Student-Run Creative Writing Workshop
The Feedback Group
Olin 304  7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Are you looking for some honest peer feedback on your work? Come read and discuss student writing and snack in a low-presure environment. All majors, years, and genres are welcome. To contribute work, email an electronic copy to as1515@bard.edu. To contribute feedback only, simply swing by.

This is the group's final Fall 2016 session.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Tuesday, November 15, 2016
Hannah Arendt, James Baldwin,
and the Politics of Kinship
Siobhan Phillips, Associate Professor of English
Dickinson College

RKC 103  6:30 pm
In the crucial years of the early 1960s, both Hannah Arendt and James Baldwin identified the problems of U.S. history as, in part, problems of kinship—affiliations created and distorted when the exigencies of human vulnerability must be satisfied in a liberal society structured by race slavery. Both distrusted the model of family they saw around them; both used the specific problems of that model to imagine different and more democratic relationships. The results challenge current conceptions of both Arendt and Baldwin by uncovering how their psychological acuity supports their historical/ethical vision. This talk aims to recognize the resources of that vision, then and now.
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Hannah Arendt Center; Literature Program
Contact: Matthew Mutter  845-758-6822  mmutter@bard.edu
Monday, November 14, 2016
A Reading by John Crowley
The winner of the World Fantasy Award reads from new fiction
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm
The World Fantasy Award–winning author of Little, Big and the Ægypt series reads from his fiction at 2:30 p.m. on Monday, November 14th, 2016, in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center. Sponsored by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by Bradford Morrow, and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.
PRAISE FOR JOHN CROWLEY
"Little, Big is a book that all by itself calls for a redefinition of fantasy." —Ursula K. Le Guin

"John Crowley writes sentences of such coruscating magnificence that the rest of the English language has fallen in love with them. I once knew an adverbial clause who was so infatuated with the linguistic beauty of Little, Big that the poor creature pined away into a comma." —James Morrow

"Crowley is generous, obsessed, fascinating, gripping. Really, I think Crowley is so good that he has left everybody else in the dust." —Peter Straub

"Dæmonomania is a prophecy of America entering the authentic new age: Magical, potentially destructive, and utterly uncanny." —Harold Bloom

"John Crowley is an abundantly gifted writer, a scholar whose passion for history is matched by his ability to write a graceful sentence." —New York Times Book Review

"Ambitious, dazzling, strangely moving. Haunting. Gripping. Astonishing." —Washington Post Book World
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, November 10, 2016
W.G. Sebald's Literary Remains:
On the Disappearance of the Author in his
Work and Archive
Dr. Ulrich von Bülow (The German Literary Archive)
Olin, Room 204  5:00 pm
The papers of W. G. Sebald (1944-2001) are preserved at the German Literary Archive in Marbach (Germany). In this talk, Dr. von Bülow, head of Marbach’s Archive Department, will display and discuss rarely seen items from Sebald’s literary estate. The themes of memory and remains —both literary and non-literary— are prominent in Sebald’s fiction, and as a scholar and author, he was more concerned than many authors about the fate of his papers after his death. Just as he created in his writings a literary persona by means of factual material, he also carefully pre-selected what should be handed down to his reading public posthumously. This tour through Sebald’s fascinating archive will culminate with a look into the manuscripts for Sebald’s last great unfinished and unpublished book project.

Dr. von Bülow has published books and articles on German writers such as Arthur Schnitzler, Peter Handke, Franz Fühmann, Tankred Dorst, and W. G. Sebald. Among the books he has edited are volumes by Rainer Maria Rilke, Erich Kästner, Karl Löwith, and Martin Heidegger. His most recent publication is a book on Hannah Arendt in Marbach.

Ulrich von Bülow is currently a Visiting Research Scholar with the German Studies Program and the Hannah Arendt Center at Bard College.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; German Studies Program
Contact: Thomas Wild  845-758-7363  twild@bard.edu
Monday, November 7, 2016
Love and its pathologies
A Reading & Conversation with by Florence Noiville
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:00 pm
On Monday, November 7, at 6:00 p.m., in the László Z. Bitó ’60 Auditorium of the Reem-Kayden Center at Bard College, Florence Noiville reads from her work and engages in dialogue with Norman Manea. This event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

The French novelist, biographer, journalist, and editor Florence Noiville is a staff writer for Le Monde and the author of such books as A Cage in Search of a Bird, The Gift, The Attachment, and Isaac B. Singer, A Life.

“What is revealed in A Cage in Search of a Bird is the presence—as strong as it is inexplicable—of love in hatred.  One must love greatly to make another suffer.” —Milan Kundera
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Monday, November 7, 2016
Open House with Florence Noiville
Coffee and conversation with the author of A Cage in Search of a Bird
Shafer House  1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
All Bard faculty and students are encouraged to stop by Shafer House anytime between 1:30 and 3:00 p.m. on Monday, November 7, for an open house with guest author Florence Noiville. Refreshments will be offered at this informal gathering for anyone interested in discussing fiction, biography, journalism, editing, or publishing with the visiting French intellectual and Le Monde staff writer.

Noiville will present a public reading and conversation with Norman Manea on the same day, at 6:00 p.m. in the Reem-Kayden Center.

Shafer House (9 Cedar Hill Road) is located on south campus at the Annandale Triangle, across from Feitler House. The reception space is located in the downstairs lounge.
Sponsored by: Dean of the College; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Thursday, November 3, 2016
“Not to be born is best.” Greek Pessimism revisited or: Was Nietzsche right?
Professor Michael Lurie, Dartmouth College
RKC 103  5:00 pm
It is a characteristic of contemporary Western culture that we are constantly told that we live in the best of all possible worlds and that we are commanded to be happy. What if our modern obsession with happiness is a tragic delusion? What if we were not born to be happy at all? What if it would be by far the best for each one of us never to have been born? Is there more to life than being happy? The gloomy, paradoxical notion that it would be by far the best for us not to be born played a crucial role in the daring, and explicitly anti-modernist, visions of pre-Platonic Greek culture advanced in the late 19th century by Jacob Burckhardt and Friedrich Nietzsche, but has been largely neglected ever since. In this lecture, we will look at the dark view of the world and man’s place in it that emerges from Greek pre-Platonic literature and thought and try to understand why modernity has always struggled to come to terms with it. 
Sponsored by: Classical Studies Program
Contact: Robert Cioffi  rcioffi@bard.edu
Wednesday, October 26, 2016
Student-Run Creative Writing Workshop
The Feedback Group
Olin 304  7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Are you looking for some honest peer feedback on your work? Come read and discuss student writing and snack in a low-presure environment. All majors, years, and genres are welcome. To contribute work, email an electronic copy to as1515@bard.edu. To contribute feedback only, simply swing by.

After the session of October 26, the feedback group will meet one more time this semester, on Wednesday, November 16
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Tuesday, October 25, 2016
The Modernist Literary Experiment: Focus on Joyce
David Vichnar, PhD, Charles University Prague
OLIN LC 208  5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
In what is one of the most thoughtful definitions of the entire movement, art critic Clement Greenberg thought the dominant trait of modernism to be "the use of characteristic methods of a discipline to criticize the discipline itself". The talk proposes to test this definition on the work of James Joyce and cover the development of his linguistic poetics, tracing his treatment of language as material from Dubliners via A Portrait and Ulysses to Finnegans Wake.
Sponsored by: Center for Civic Engagement; Division of Languages and Literature
Contact: James Romm  845-758-7283  romm@bard.edu
Monday, October 24, 2016
A lecture by Yahoo! Finance editor in chief Andy Serwer
Journalism in the Age of Trump, Ailes, Buzzfeed, Gawker, & Facebook
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  4:45 pm – 5:45 pm
Andy Serwer presents the second annual John J. Curran '75 Lecture in Journalism, Monday, October 24, at 4:45 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, introduced by Bard writer in residence Benjamin Hale.
 
“Achaea had Homer, the Spanish Civil War had Hemingway, California had the Beach Boys, and now our hyperactive stock market has its own poet singer: Andy Serwer.” —The New Yorker

As editor in chief for the top financial news site, Yahoo Finance, ANDY SERWER oversees all editorial content, from in-depth stories to breaking news to original video programming.

Serwer launched the groundbreaking and enormously influential business-news blog Streetlife in 1997. Now one of the world’s leading business journalists, he worked twenty-nine years at Time, served for eight years as Fortune’s managing editor, and was CNN’s American Morning business anchor from 2001 to 2006.

In 2000, TJFR Business News Reporter named Serwer as its Business Journalist of the Year, lauding him as “perhaps the nation’s top multimedia talent, successfully juggling the roles of serious journalist, astute commentator and occasional court jester.”
 
Andy Serwer will deliver this lecture again at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 25th, at the Bard Graduate Center in NYC. That event is free and open to the public, but online registration is required. Visit the Bard Alumni/ae Network's website to learn more and register.
 
John J. Curran '75 Lectures in Journalism honors the memory of a proud Bardian whose dedication to ethical reporting in journalism informed a trusting readership for over a quarter of a century and promoted a culture of honesty, integrity, and truth.
Sponsored by: Office of Development and Alumni/ae Affairs; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Monday, October 24, 2016
Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II
A Lecture by Farah Jasmine Griffin
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  4:30 pm
Farah Jasmine Griffin, William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies at Columbia University

"Her body in the air looked like an abstract sculpture," Griffin writes of Pearl Primus's dance in the 1840s.  

"In her book “Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II,[2013]” Farah Jasmine Griffin, a professor at Columbia University, delves into a largely underexplored aspect of Harlem’s rich history: the years just before, during and immediately after World War II, a period of optimism, creativity and turmoil. Moreover, Griffin uses the lives of three female artists — the choreographer and dancer Pearl Primus, the writer Ann Petry and the composer and pianist Mary Lou Williams — as signposts through an era, in a work that paints the “greatest generation” in a much less flattering light than do the usual jingoistic accounts."  ~The New York Times
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Dance Program; Difference and Media Project; Historical Studies Program; Literature Program
Contact: Myra Armstead  845-758-6822  armstead@bard.edu
Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Jennifer Scappettone
 
Reading her new poems from EXIT 43: Outtakes and Scores from an Archaeology and Pop-Up Opera of the Corporate Dump and her translations from Locomotrix: Selected Poetry and Prose of Amelia Rosselli
Olin 202  6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Jennifer Scappettone is Associate Professor of English, Creative Writing, and Romance Languages and Literatures at the University of Chicago. Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice, her study of the outmoded city of lagoons as a crucible for experiments across literature, politics, urbanism, and the visual arts, was published by Columbia University Press in 2014. Her translations from the polyglot poet and musicologist Amelia Rosselli were collected in Locomotrix: Selected Poetry and Prose of Amelia Rosselli. She is now at work on translations of the futurist F.T. Marinetti and feminist Carla Lonzi. She founded, and now curates, PennSound Italiana, a new sector of the audiovisual archive based at the University of Pennsylvania devoted to experimental Italian poetry. Her poetry collections include From Dame Quickly (Litmus Press in 2009) and EXIT 43: Outtakes and Scores from an Archaeology and Pop-Up Opera of the Corporate Dump (Atelos Press 2016).

Installation pieces were exhibited most recently at Una Vetrina Gallery in Rome and WUHO Gallery in Los Angeles, and she has collaborated on multidisciplinary performance works with a wide range of musicians, architects, and dancers. She is currently sharing a Mellon Fellowship for Arts and Scholarship with the code artist Judd Morrissey and cross-media artist Caroline Bergvall at the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry to work on a project exploring the poetics and politics of air called The Data That We Breathe.    
Sponsored by: Division of Languages and Literature; Italian Studies Program; Written Arts Program
Contact: Franco Baldasso  845-758-7337  baldasso@bard.edu
Wednesday, October 19, 2016
The Hannah Arendt Edition Series - Inaugural Lecture - Jerome Kohn: The Work of Art
Olin, Room 204  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Lecture by Jerome Kohn (Hannah Arendt Literary Trust; The New School). Discussant: Thomas Bartscherer (Bard College)

In this talk, the work of art is not employed as a synonym for an artwork. One of its references is to what artists do when they make artworks; another is to what spectators do when they preserve – through their apperception – artworks over periods of time. The unprecedented evil of the 20th century, according to Hannah Arendt, has left us with a “broken thread of tradition.” From the point of view of the world – though not of history – every end is a beginning, a beginning whose end is not known in advance. A matter of increasing wonder to Arendt was how and where we can realize a new beginning today. The Work of Art will explore this question in conversation with thinkers such as Plato, Kant, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Rilke, and several eminent visual artworks. In his talk, Jerome Kohn will for the first time present from his unpublished book manuscript “The Work of Art.”

Jerome Kohn is the Trustee of the Hannah Arendt Bluecher Literary Trust. He has published several volumes of Arendt's uncollected and unpublished writing, such as Essays In Understanding, Responsibility and Judgment, The Promise Of Politics, and The Jewish Writings. He is currently preparing a new edition of collected unpublished texts by Hannah Arendt titled Thinking Without Bannisters.

Thomas Bartscherer is Assistant Professor of Humanities at Bard College. He is co-editor of Erotikon: Essay on Eros, Ancient and Modern and Switching Codes: Thinking Through Digital Technology in the Humanities and the Arts. He is currently completing a book titled Toward an Erotics of Tragedy and is co-editor of Arendt’s The Life of the Mind for the forthcoming Critical Edition of Hannah Arendt’s Complete Works.

This event is co-sponsored by the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities, German Studies Program, Literature Program, and by the Philosophy Program

Location: Olin 204 [MAP]
Date: Wednesday, October 19th, 2016
Time: 6:00 p.m.

Rsvp not required
Free & open to the Public
Sponsored by: Hannah Arendt Center
Contact:
Tuesday, October 18, 2016
Venice by Electric Moonlight
Jennifer Scappettone, University of Chicago
RKC 103  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Jennifer Scappettone is Associate Professor of English, Creative Writing, and Romance Languages and Literatures at the University of Chicago. Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice, her study of the outmoded city of lagoons as a crucible for experiments across literature, politics, urbanism, and the visual arts, was published by Columbia University Press in 2014. Her translations from the polyglot poet and musicologist Amelia Rosselli were collected in Locomotrix: Selected Poetry and Prose of Amelia Rosselli. She is now at work on translations of the futurist F.T. Marinetti and feminist Carla Lonzi. She founded, and now curates, PennSound Italiana, a new sector of the audiovisual archive based at the University of Pennsylvania devoted to experimental Italian poetry. Her poetry collections include From Dame Quickly (Litmus Press in 2009) and EXIT 43: Outtakes and Scores from an Archaeology and Pop-Up Opera of the Corporate Dump (Atelos Press 2016).

Installation pieces were exhibited most recently at Una Vetrina Gallery in Rome and WUHO Gallery in Los Angeles, and she has collaborated on multidisciplinary performance works with a wide range of musicians, architects, and dancers. She is currently sharing a Mellon Fellowship for Arts and Scholarship with the code artist Judd Morrissey and cross-media artist Caroline Bergvall at the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry to work on a project exploring the poetics and politics of air called The Data That We Breathe.    
Sponsored by: Division of Languages and Literature; Italian Studies Program; Written Arts Program
Contact: Franco Baldasso  845-758-7337  baldasso@bard.edu
Monday, October 17, 2016
"It's a beautiful thing": A History of Reading Closely
Seth Lerer, Distinguished Professor of Literature,
University of California at San Diego

RKC 103  5:00 pm
What is the place of literature in an ironic age? Can we still have an affective relationship to the literary past? My talk explores the ways in which some English and American writers interrogate the social value of close reading and the personally felt relationship to books. Given the recent return to formal criticism in Departments of Literature, and given the challenges to the Humanities in contemporary society, many critics have advocated a new way of "loving literature." Is this sentimental or sensible? My talk opens up these questions for the student and the teacher of the book in a digital age. 
Sponsored by: Literature Program; Medieval Studies Program
Contact: Maria Cecire  845-758-7697  mcecire@bard.edu
Monday, October 17, 2016
A Reading by Can Xue
China’s greatest prose experimentalist reads from recent work
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  4:00 pm
Can Xue is a Chinese avant-garde fiction writer and literary critic. English translations of her fiction include Blue Light in the Sky and Other Stories, Five Spice Street, Vertical Motion, The Last Lover (winner of the Best Translated Book Award), and the forthcoming Frontier.

Introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. The reading is presented by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series and cosponsored by the Program in Written Arts, with support from the Chinese Students Organization and Bard’s programs in Chinese and Asian studies.

“If China has one possibility of a Nobel laureate it is Can Xue.” —Susan Sontag

“Can Xue is one of the most innovative and important contemporary writers in world literature. She possesses one of the most glorious, vivid, lyrical, elaborate, poignant, hellacious imaginations on the planet. She is the finest revolutionary Gothicist writing today and the true daughter of Kafka and Borges. No reader emerges from her powerful fictional dreams unscathed, for her work is as dangerous as it is beautiful. She can infiltrate the deepest part of our human experience with such subtlety and totality that it takes my breath away.” —Bradford Morrow

“All that opposes my training, my literary culture, and even my gut instincts as a writer lives in her self-presentation. Here is the writer as true iconoclast, the uncompromising original.” —Porochista Khakpour

“Can Xue has found not just a new direction but a new dimension to move in, a realm where conscious beings experience space, time, and each other unbound from the old rules.” —Music and Literature

“Can Xue is the most original voice to arise in Chinese literature since the midcentury upheavals. Although nothing is predictable here, each line as if plucked anew from space, there is nonetheless a profound organicity. In short, there’s a new world master among us and her name is Can Xue.” —Robert Coover

“The traditional expectation of narrative history in China has been to find a central meaning that could effectively master chaos. Can Xue’s stories are like a piece of dynamite at the foundation of this elaborate edifice.” —Modern Chinese Literature
Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  conjunctions@bard.edu
Wednesday, October 12, 2016
Student-Run Creative Writing Workshop
The Feedback Group
Olin 304  7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Are you looking for some honest peer feedback on your work? Come read and discuss student writing and snack in a low-presure environment. All majors, years, and genres are welcome. To contribute work, email an electronic copy to as1515@bard.edu. To contribute feedback only, simply swing by.

Come to one or all of the following workshops, all at the same place and time: Wednesday, October 12 Wednesday, October 26 Wednesday, November 16https://www.facebook.com/events/257709577959851/
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  writtenarts@bard.edu
Thursday, October 6, 2016
Visual Attention as Ethical Action:
Tolstoy - Cézanne - Salgado
Thomas Pfau, Alice Mary Baldwin Professor of English, Professor & Chair of Germanic Languages & Literatures, Duke Divinity School
RKC 103  5:00 pm
This lecture will explore three case studies of visual attention and its ethical dimensions: a photograph by Sebastião Salgado; two paintings by Cézanne discussed by R. M. Rilke, and the harvesting scene opening Part III of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina. In each instance, Thomas Pfau's focus will be on how the response elicited by a specific image triggers a distinctive ethical insight, a type of knowledge impossible to capture in propositional terms and achievable only through the medium of the image. The ethics of attention solicited by the image and subsequently articulated in writing involves empathy and, ultimately, demands a kind of participatory action on the part of the beholder. The lecture's overriding aim is to present attention as a form of knowledge neither "owned" nor "controlled" by the beholding subject but, on the contrary, transformative of the beholder.
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; German Studies Program; Hannah Arendt Center; Literature Program
Contact: Matthew Mutter  845-758-6822  mmutter@bard.edu
  Friday, September 30, 2016
Bard Student Fiction Reading
Shafer House  7:00 pm
Any and all Bard students are warmly invited to join a fiction reading in the downstairs lounge of Shafer House (the Written Arts building) on Friday, September 30, at 7pm. Bring incomplete work, a sentence, a chapter, a paragraph, an idea, and share it! Or just come to listen to your peers' work and munch on the snacks provided. 

Contact student organizers Cleo Egnal or Anna Sones with questions. 
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Monday, September 26, 2016
The Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series Presents Andrew Ervin
The author reads from his debut novel, Burning Down George Orwell’s House
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
On Monday, September 26th, at 2:30 p.m., Andrew Ervin reads from Burning Down George Orwell’s House in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center. Introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

“Beyond being a vastly entertaining novel, cunningly observed and delicately flavored with the very finest Scotch whisky on the planet, Burning Down George Orwell’s House is a serious meditation on just how Orwellian our world has really become. Let Andrew Ervin help you imagine your way to a world beyond Big Brother.”
—Madison Smartt Bell

Burning Down George Orwell’s House is a sweet book full of delights. Since many of its best passages are rhapsodies on single malt whiskies, one is tempted to call it a wee bonny dram of a tale.”
—Christopher Buckley, New York Times Book Review
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  conjunctions@bard.edu
Thursday, September 22, 2016
The Authorial "I" Is Always
a Fiction ... Except When It Isn't
Paul Strohm, Columbia University and Queen Mary, University of London
Olin, Room 204  5:00 pm
What is to be made of the poet’s and fiction writer’s invented “I” and the potentially bogus details in which it is arrayed?  With respect to matters of biographical truth, the normal and sensible answer is normally: nothing at all.  Yet the pre-modern literary biographer—limited by a paucity of available material—can hardly afford to neglect this tantalizing source of potential life-evidence.  Author of a recent Chaucer biography, Chaucer’s Tale: 1386 and the Road to Canterbury (2014), Paul Strohm will speak about the interpretative temptations posed by the author’s elusive “I.”  He will pursue this question in writings by Chaucer, and, more briefly, in contemporary instances from gangsta rap and the “non-fiction novels” of Karl Ove Knausgaard.
        
Paul Strohm is the author of Social Chaucer (Harvard, 1989,1994); Hochon's Arrow: The Social Imagination of Fourteenth-Century Texts (Princeton, 1992); England's Empty Throne: Usurpation and Textual Legitimation, 1399-1422 (Yale UK, 1998); Theory and the Premodern Text (Minnesota, 2000); Politique: Languages of Statecraft Between Chaucer and Shakespeare (Notre Dame, 2005); and Chaucer’s Tale: 1386 and the Road to Canterbury (Viking, 2014).  He has been J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Oxford and Garbedian Professor of the Humanities at Columbia University.  He is currently Honorary Research Professor at Queen Mary, University of London.
Sponsored by: Historical Studies Program; Literature Program; Medieval Studies Program; Written Arts Program
Contact: Marisa Libbon  845-758-7211  mlibbon@bard.edu
  Friday, May 13, 2016
Literary Hangout with Alexandra Kleeman
Join the Bard Fiction Prize winner for pizza, conversation, and readings of favorite short stories
Shafer House  6:00 pm
Bard Fiction Prize winner and writer in residence Alexandra Kleeman invites all students to an informal gathering on Friday, May 13th, at 6pm in the downstairs lounge of Shafer House (the Written Arts building at the Annandale Triangle).

Come eat some pizza and ask Alex about anything on your mind. She's happy to discuss anything from writerly craft and process to Life After Bard.

You're also invited to bring a short story by a favorite author to read aloud and discuss. However, those who don't wish to bring a story, and/or those who don't want to read aloud are still very welcome to attend.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Written Arts Senior Project Readings
The third of a three-night series
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  8:00 pm
Graduating students in the Written Arts program present short readings from their senior projects in fiction, poetry, narrative nonfiction, and other or hybrid genres at 8:00 p.m. in the Reem Kayden Center's László Z. Bitó '60 Auditorium. All are welcome!
 The May 11th readers
(roughly in order of appearance):Sophia SchwabEdward ByrneEvan CrommettCaily HerbertMelanie MignucciMaya MovermanRosa SchwartzburgThatcher SnyderSophie StrandFraiser Kansteiner
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Monday, May 9, 2016
Written Arts Senior Project Readings
The second of a three-night series
Olin, Room 102  8:00 pm
Graduating students in the Written Arts program present short readings from their senior projects in fiction, poetry, narrative nonfiction, and other or hybrid genres at 8:00 p.m. in Olin 102. All are welcome!
 The May 9th readers
(roughly in order of appearance):Giulia MascaliMyra Al-rahimJanet BarrowJohn CherichelloGabriella GonzalesKevin McDonaldEmily McInerneyRio Viera-NewtonAnna Kornfeld
Alec Montecalvo
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Thursday, May 5, 2016
Written Arts Senior Project Readings
The first of a three-night series
Olin, Room 102  8:00 pm
Graduating students in the Written Arts program present short readings from their senior projects in fiction, poetry, narrative nonfiction, and other or hybrid genres at 8:00 p.m. in Olin 102. All are welcome!
 The May 5th readers
(roughly in order of appearance):Marion AlbersNick BinnetteEmily DeGeyterAlex HackerJohn IstonaJulie JaremaElissa Jane MastelIan McElfreshKassandra ThatcherGrace Caizza
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Saturday, April 30, 2016
Digital Spaces
Experimental Humanities Unconference
Reem-Kayden Center  10:30 am – 6:00 pm
The Digital Arts, Sciences, and Humanities (DASH) Lab of SUNY New Paltz and the Experimental Humanities concentration at Bard College would like to invite you to a two-day joint Digital Spaces Unconference. We will gather together for a series of workshops, discussions, and speakers focusing on bringing digital tools into teaching, research, and other collaborative endeavors.The Digital Spaces Unconference is a place for local and regional faculty, staff and community members to gather, to share, to learn and inspire! We seek to build a regional network of digital scholars not only to enhance our own work, but also to push the boundaries of intersectional digital scholarship and public discourse.

What is an “Unconference”?
An unconference (http://thatcamp.org/about/) is an informal gathering where interested faculty, students, and staff gather to learn about technology. Instead of formal panels or presentations, participants can attend workshops on particular tools and digital platforms, including Omeka (digital archiving), Neatline (maps and timelines), Python (programming language), and WordPress (blogs, interactive publishing). You can also join discussion groups on topics as various as using blogging in the classroom to mapping census data for a research project. No prior experience or outside preparation required!When is the unconference?
The joint Digital Spaces Unconference will take place on April 29- 30th.Friday, April 29th (11:30am-7:00pm) at The Terrace (SUNY New Paltz)
Our event schedule includes opening remarks, a panel on public humanities, a workshop on data visualization, lighting talks by interested faculty members, and an opening keynote address. The day will end with optional small group dinners in town.Saturday, April 30th (10:30am-6pm) at the Reem-Kayden Center (Bard College)
The second day of events will include a combination of workshops, informal discussions, and a closing keynote address delivered by Jen Jack Giesking.Why “Digital Spaces”:
We’re interested in all manner of “digital spaces,” including online tools (such as Omeka, WordPress, and Twitter) and the spaces where we do digital work (the classroom, the DASH Lab–Digital Arts, Sciences, and Humanities Lab at SUNY New Paltz–and Experimental Humanities at Bard, and research or teaching “in the field”).Join us for the intersection of physical and digital spaces for the first SUNY New Paltz/Bard College joint unconference!
Sponsored by: Experimental Humanities Program
Contact: Heidi Knoblauch   845-758-4385  hknoblau@bard.edu
Thursday, April 28, 2016
Weaponized Architecture from Palestine
to the Paris Suburbs
Leopold Lambert, editor of The Funambulist magazine and author of the books Topie Impitoyable and Bulldozer Politcs.
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  5:00 pm
Architecture is a political weapon. Its elemental form, the wall, organizes (sometimes violently) bodies in space both at the domestic and geographical levels. This lecture will introduce instances of such violence through the two examples of Palestine and the French banlieues (suburbs). The case of Palestine will be presented in terms of the role of architecture in the current situation and with reference to a post-apartheid vision for the future. The French banlieues are the dwelling places of a post-colonial population who must cope with both segregative urbanism and an antagonistic relationship with the police, which has been exacerbated during the present state of emergency in France. In both cases, a political and architectural interpretation of the situation will be presented through cartography and photography.

Free & open to the public
Sponsored by: Art History Program; Environmental and Urban Studies Program; French Studies Program; Human Rights Project; Literature Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Nathan Shockey  845-758-6822  nshockey@bard.edu
  Friday, April 22, 2016
Plenary Session of the Bard-IWT Annual Conference
"The Difficulty with Poetry: Opacity and Implication in the New and Old"
Panelists: Ann Lauterbach, Charles Bernstein, and Simone White
Olin Hall  11:00 am – 12:30 pm
The Bard community is cordially invited to attend the Plenary Session of the IWT Annual Conference.
 Panelists:Ann Lauterbach, poet, David and Ruth Schwab Professor of Languages and Literature, Bard College, and Faculty, Milton Avery Graduate School of the ArtsCharles Bernstein, poet, Donald T. Regan Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University PennsylvaniaSimone White, poet, faculty of the Bard College Language and Thinking Program, Program Manager at The Poetry ProjectModerator: Ian Bickford, Provost, Bard College at Simon's RockDiscussant: Thomas Wild, Associate Professor of German The Bard community is cordially invited to attend this plenary session, no registration required. To learn more and to register for the full day-long workshops on teaching difficult poetry, please visit our website http://writingandthinking.org/portfolio-items/conference-april-2016/
 Please also note on Thursday, April 21st at 6pm in the Multi-Purpose Room of the Bertelsmann Campus Center, The Bard College Institute for Writing and Thinking, the Bard Language and Literature Program and the Bard literary journal Conjunctions will co-host a celebration of the work of Ann Lauterbach. This event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. More information is available on our website: http://writingandthinking.org/portfolio-items/a-celebration-of-poet-and-essayist-ann-lauterbach/
Sponsored by: Institute for Writing and Thinking
Contact: Olesia Guran  845-758-7484  oguran@bard.edu
Thursday, April 21, 2016
A Celebration of Poet and Essayist Ann Lauterbach
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  6:00 pm
Save the Date: Ann Lauterbach Celebration

Please join us at 6:00 p.m. on April 21st at the Bertelsmann Campus Center’s Multipurpose Room for a celebratory reading of the work of Ann Lauterbach, David and Ruth Schwab Professor of Languages and Literature, member of the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts faculty, and the renowned author of Under the Sign; Or to Begin Again (National Book Award nominee); Hum; If in Time: Selected Poems 1975–2000The Night Sky: Writings on the Poetics of Experience; and other books.

Celebrating Ann’s work will be the poets Jibade-Khalil Huffman ’03, Simone White, Michael Ives, Camille Guthrie, and Anselm Berrigan, who will briefly discuss their artistic relationship to Lauterbach’s influential oeuvre. The reading will culminate with Ann reading her own work.

Presented by the Bard Institute of Writing and Thinking, the literary journal Conjunctions, and the Bard Division of Languages and Literature, the celebration is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Available for sale and signing will be limited-edition broadsides of Ann's work, exclusively produced for this event by Ugly Duckling Presse; and copies of her books from Oblong Books & Music.

This event is part of the annual IWT April Conference, which this year engages the theme “The Difficulty with Poetry: Opacity and Implication in the New and Old” and features the e-book edition of Conjunctions’ landmark American Poetry issue. Registration is open for the Friday, April 22nd conference, which will include a panel on “Difficulty” at 11am in Olin Auditorium. Panelists will include Ann Lauterbach, Charles Bernstein, and Simone White. The conference also includes a series of writing-based workshops on poetry and difficulty led by IWT Faculty Associates. For more information, see http://writingandthinking.org/portfolio-items/conference-april-2016/​.
*
 PRAISE FOR ANN LAUTERBACH
“The mystery and longing in Ann Lauterbach’s work, the wit and heart are the things we feel on our skin.” —Don DeLillo

“Lauterbach has found new forms for expressing the continuousness of change: its ways of summoning and disrupting intimacy, of evoking and subverting the position of perceptions and the framing and decentering play of language itself.” —Boston Review

“Ann Lauterbach’s poetry goes straight to the elastic, infinite core of time.” —John Ashbery


 

Sponsored by: Institute for Writing and Thinking
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  conjunctions@bard.edu
Monday, April 18, 2016
A Reading & Film Screening by Eli Gottlieb
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm – 3:45 pm
The award-winning author of The Boy Who Went Away, Now You See Him, and The Face Thief reads from Best Boy, his new novel about autism, memory, and redemption.

A short documentary film featuring Gottlieb's brother, the model for the protagonist of Best Boy, will be screened at the start of the reading.

Introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the event takes place at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, and is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

PRAISE FOR BEST BOY

“Raw and beautiful with a mesmerizingly rhythmic narration. What rises and shines from the page is Todd Aaron, a hero of such singular character and clear spirit that you will follow him anywhere. You won’t just root for him, you will fight and push and pray for him to wrest control of his future. You will read this book in one sitting or maybe two, and you will miss this man deeply when you are done.” —Washington Post

“Fascinating. Gottlieb's imaginings of what's going on in the mind of an adult living somewhere on the autism spectrum feel credible and real. Lyrical.” —Chicago Tribune

“I've fallen in love with Best Boy, touched by its delicacy and fearless truths.” —Cynthia Ozick

“Arresting. The book’s empathy is bracing.” —New Yorker

“An eloquent, sensitive rendering of a marginalized life. Gottlieb merits praise for both the endearing eloquence of Todd's voice and a deeply sympathetic parable that speaks to a time when rising autism rates and long-lived elders force many to weigh tough options.” —Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review

“The latest from Gottlieb is written through the perspective of Todd: his voice is spectacular, oscillating between casual and obsessive and frequently challenging the stereotypes that haunt those with autism and similar conditions. Gottlieb’s attention to crafting Todd’s internal monologue is something to behold.” —Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

Best Boy is a remarkable achievement—an intimate and convincing portrayal of what the world looks like from inside the mind of a mentally handicapped but unusually sensitive, observant, and decent man.” —Alison Lurie
Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, April 14, 2016
A Reading by Roberto Tejada
Chapel of the Holy Innocents  6:00 pm
The celebrated poet and art critic Roberto Tejada, author of works including Mirrors for Gold and Exposition Park, reads from his work Thursday, April 14th, at 6:00 p.m. in the Bard chapel, introduced by Ann Lauterbach.

The event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

Full Foreground composes a musical sequence whose desire is for lyric discourse to voice bodily sensation in the shadow of global command. It speaks of discontinuous times and locations on the borderlands of Mexico, the United States, and beyond, from 1997 to the present. The prologue poem was written in the weeks prior to the 2003 invasion of Iraq; the afterword, on the ten-year anniversary of the September 11 attacks, with language lifted from N. R. Kleinfield (New York Times, 12 September 2001, p.A1). From that duration and geography is reflected a language of current events, journalism, state demagoguery, the ethnographic account, and the pathologies of violence and massacre; extensions of a self “myself”—in spaces of public address.” — Roberto Tejada, Notes to Full Foreground (2012)
 
“Crisscrossing languages, geographical borders (the Mexican-United States border is only one of several), and cultural taboos, Exposition Park is, in the most literal sense, a transgressive text, one of those books that rewards reading after reading.” —Tyrone Williams

“Tejada’s work is with dismantling borders and upsetting classifications. The result is a layered poetry that finds its form in dense stanzas composed of lines that frequently veer toward a kind of fractured prose.”—Alan Gilbert

“You walk through his world as a voyeur, a traveler of mirrors, witnessing your own reflection in the masses of flesh, simultaneously aroused and disturbed at the same time. Tejada’s work is an invitation, a window into another world, unabashedly erotic, and succinct.” —Christine Lark Fox
Sponsored by: John Ashbery Poetry Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Monday, April 11, 2016
Bard Student Fiction Reading
All students writers are welcome to share work with the group or just listen.
Shafer House  7:00 pm
Any and all Bard students are warmly invited to join a fiction reading in the downstairs lounge of Shafer House (the Written Arts building) on Monday, April 11th, at 7pm. Bring incomplete work, a sentence, a chapter, a paragraph, an idea, and share it! Or just come to listen to your peers' work and munch on the snacks provided. 

RSVP on Facebook or contact Cleo Egnal with questions. 
Sponsored by: Cleo Egnal; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Friday, April 8, 2016
Sound in Theory, Sound in Practice
April 7-8, 2016 at Bard College
a two day symposium exploring the place of sound in the arts, sciences, and humanities

Blum  9:00 am
Friday, April 8 @Blum

9am Prelude
Georgian Polyphony Workshop with Carl Linich

10am  Aurality
A panel discussion with Tomie Hahn (RPI), Brian Hochman (Georgetown University), Julianne Swartz (Bard College), & Amanda Weidman (Bryn Mawr College)
Chaired by Alex Benson (Bard College0

11:30am  Interlude
Physics of Sound with Matthew Deady
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

1:00pm  Transmission
A panal discussion with Masha Godovannaya (Smolny College), Tom Porcello (Vassar College), Drew Thompson (Bard College0, and Olga Touloumi (Bard College0
Chaired by Danielle Riou (Bard College)

2:30pm Interlude
Oral History Workshop with Suzanne Snider
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

3:30pm  Resonance
A panel discussion with Marie Abe (Boston University), Emilio Distretti (Al-Quds), Erica Robles-Anderson (NYU), Maria Sonevytsky (Bard College), & David Suisman (University of Delaware)
Chaired by Laura Kunreuther

5:00pm  Deep Listening Workshop
with Pauline Oliveros

6:00pm  Closing Remarks
 **This event is free and open to the public. 
Registration is required for all interludes**

 
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Anthropology Program; Art History Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Computer Science Program; Dean of the College; Division of Languages and Literature; Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing; Division of Social Studies; Division of the Arts; Experimental Humanities Program; Film and Electronic Arts Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Project; Office of the President; Physics Program; Studio Arts Program
Contact: Laura Kunreuther  845-758-7215  kunreuth@bard.edu
Monday, April 4, 2016
A Reading by Rick Moody
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm – 3:45 pm
The celebrated author of Garden State, The Ice Storm, The Ring of Brightest Angels Around Heaven, Purple America, The Black Veil: A Memoir with Digressions, and other books reads from his new novel, Hotels of North America.

Introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading takes place at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, and is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

"Rick Moody is one of the most prodigiously talented writers in America." – Wall Street Journal

"Moody is a stylishly clever writer." —Time

"Rick Moody writes exquisite, word-smitten prose." —Elle

"Entertaining and often poignant, Rick Moody probes the limits of technology, consciousness, and language in the face of grief." – The New Yorker

"Moody’s powers of invention, his ease in his own prose, his ability to develop interesting characters — in short, his enormous gifts as a writer — are on full display." – New York Times Book Review
 
Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Friday, April 1, 2016
A Reading by Novelist Barbara Roether
Anne Cox Chambers Alumni/ae Center  6:00 pm
Barbara Roether MFA ’87 reads from her new novel, This Earth You’ll Come Back To, introduced by Robert Kelly.

The reading takes place at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, April 1st, in the Seena and Arnold Davis ’44 Living Room at the Anne Cox Chambers Alumni/ae Center and is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

PRAISE FOR THIS EARTH YOU’LL COME BACK TO

“From her afterlife a newly dead mother watches her restless wandering daughter arriving, late as usual, at the cemetery. Skeptic, forgiving, loving, the mother tells us the girl’s story, about her wanderings and the whole family from which she wandered. This is an astonishing narrative feat, a self-portrait through the eyes of the Other, the Mother. Through her unforgettable debut novel, Roether sustains a luminous and compassionate embrace of how we fail, and fail each other, and life still goes richly on.” —Robert Kelly
Sponsored by: Office of Alumni/ae Affairs; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, March 31, 2016
A Reading by Michael Ives
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:00 pm
Poet Michael Ives, Bard’s visiting assistant professor of the humanities, reads from his work Thursday, March 31st, at 6:00 p.m. in the Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito ‘60 Auditorium, introduced by Ann Lauterbach.

The event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Books will be available for sale and signing from Oblong Books & Music.

A jazz musician, an innovator in the field of text in performance, and the recipient of the Academy of American Poets Prize and the Lillian Fairchild Award, Michael Ives is also the founding member and composer of the sound/text performance trio F’loom and the author of Wavetable (Dr. Cicero Books) and The External Combustion Engine (Futurepoem). Ives’s work can be found in Open Letters Monthly, Seneca Review, and elsewhere.

“Michael Ives’s cunningly quarried prose plinths are stippled with the comedy and cruelty of Marcel Duchamp’s and Raymond Roussel’s wildest inventions. Move over, machines célibataires—The External Combustion Engine has arrived, and it’s hummin’!” —John Ashbery
Sponsored by: John Ashbery Poetry Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Tuesday, March 29, 2016
Careers in Publishing: A Conversation with Book & Magazine Editors Michael Reynolds (Europa) & Dayna Tortorici (n+1)
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:00 pm
Michael Reynolds, editor of the book-publishing house Europa, and Dayna Tortorici, coeditor of the magazine n+1, discuss careers in publishing, in a conversation moderated by Mona Simpson, author of Casebook and a Bard writer in residence.

The event takes place Tuesday, March 29th, at 6:00 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, and is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Tuesday, March 15, 2016
Cocoa and & Readings with Bard Fiction Prize Winner Alexandra Kleeman
9 Faculty Circle (Bard Fiction Prize Residence)  7:30 pm
All Bard students are invited to join Bard Fiction Prize winner Alexandra Kleeman at her home, 9 Faculty Circle (up the steep driveway beside Olin Language Center, on the way to the President's House), on Tuesday, March 15, at 7:30pm.

There will be tea and cocoa, and the group will read a short story or two out loud. Alexandra will bring one of her favorite stories, and all students are welcome to bring one of their own choosing.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Tuesday, March 15, 2016
Immersing Miami
Alexandra T. Vazquez, Associate Professor,
Department of Performance Studies, New York University

RKC 103  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
This talk involves a willful submerging into the performance ecologies of Miami, Florida. The city, too often made mere fulcrum for many a geopolitical before and after, holds rich and established resources for creative practices. Far beyond a cultural wasteland or cold war terminus, Miami's artists have long made things from vast distances, inside precarious currents, outside of their families. “Immersing Miami” is and isn’t about the city; it is an exercise on how to write through the intimacies of the local and out towards parallel gatherings. The talk specifically works with the 1998 “Speed Split” series by the Cuban born, Miami-based artist Consuelo Castañeda (b. 1958) as an opportunity to transpose an artist’s visual mode into a musical response to displacement and dispossession. Castañeda extends a call to listen on the insides of the alienating narratives that drown Miami and in doing so enables us to hear robust aesthetic histories everywhere else.

Alexandra T. Vazquez was born in Miami, Florida. She is Associate Professor in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University. Her book, Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music (Duke University Press 2013), won the American Studies Association’s Lora Romero Book Prize in 2014. Vazquez’s work has been featured in the journals American Quarterly, Social Text, women and performance, and the Journal of Popular Music Studies, and in the edited volumes Reggaeton and Pop When the World Falls Apart.
Sponsored by: American Studies Program; Ethnomusicology; LAIS Program; Literature Program
Contact: Maria Sonevytsky   845-752-2405  msonevyt@bard.edu
Thursday, March 10, 2016
A Reading by John Keene
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The celebrated and award-winning author of books including Annotations and, most recently, Counternarratives reads from his work at 6:00 p.m. in  Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, on Thursday, March 10th. Introduced by Mary Caponegro and followed by a Q&A, this event is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Books will be available for sale and signing from Oblong Books & Music.

John R. Keene's Counternarratives, a collection of stories and novellas, draws upon memoirs, newspaper accounts, detective stories, interrogation transcripts, and speculative fiction to create new and strange perspectives on our past and present. "An Outtake" chronicles an escaped slave's take on liberty and the American Revolution. "The Strange History of Our Lady of the Sorrows" presents a bizarre series of events that unfold in a nineteenth-century Kentucky convent. "The Aeronauts" soars between bustling Philadelphia, still-rustic Washington, and the theater of the U.S. Civil War. In "Acrobatique," the subject of a famous Edgar Degas painting talks back. And the hotly debated, widely praised story "Rivers" presents a free Jim meeting up decades later with his former raftmate Huckleberry Finn.
 *
PRAISE FOR Counternarratives

"Keene exerts superb control over his stories, costuming them in the style of Jorge Luis Borges …Yet he preserves the undercurrent of excitement and pathos that accompanies his characters' persecution and their groping toward freedom." —Wall Street Journal

"An extraordinary work of literature. John Keene is a dense, intricate, and magnificent writer. " —Harper's

"Suspenseful, thought provoking, mystical, and haunting. Keene's confident writing doesn't aim for easy description or evaluation; it approaches (and defies) literature on its own terms." —Publishers Weekly

"Only a few, John Keene among them, in our age, authentically test the physics of fiction as both provocation and mastery. Continuing what reads like the story collection as freedom project, in Counternarratives, Keene opens swaths of history for readers to more than imagine but to manifest and live in the passionate language of conjure and ritual." —Major Jackson

"Keene finds inspiration in newspaper clippings, memoirs, and history, and anchors them in the eternal, universal, and mystical." —Vanity Fair

"John Keene undertakes a kind of literary counterarchaeology, a series of fictions that challenge our notion of what constitutes 'real' or 'accurate' history. His writing is at turns playful and erudite, lyric and coldly diagnostic, but always completely absorbing. Counternarratives could easily be compared to Borges or Bolano, Calvino or Kiš, but at the same time it is a deeply American, resolutely contemporary book, that asks us to reconsider our own perspectives on the past―and the future." —Jess Row

"Of the scope of William T. Vollmann or Samuel R. Delany, but with a kaleidoscopic intuition all its own, Counternarratives is very easily one of the most vividly imagined and vitally timed books of the year. I haven't felt so refreshed in quite a while as a reader." —VICE

"Keene opens up the spaces between words and their objects, to create room where fresh meanings can play." —The Nation

"Queering the script, defying the imperative to be silent, does not require confidence or a vision of what progress means. It is, rather, in all its uncertainty and risk, the most basic stuff of―the very matter of―life. It is also the crowning achievement of one of the year's very best books." —The Quarterly Conversation

"Keene's collection of short and longer historical fictions are formally varied, mold-breaking, and deeply political. He's a radical artist working in the most conservative genres, and any search for innovation in this year's U.S. fiction should start here." —Vulture

"A series of stories in which religion and spirituality, art and language, violence and subjugation, homosexuality and eroticism, may shine through a panoply of voices." —Full Stop

"Practically every sentence in the book perforates, stretches out, or pries open literary modes designed to be airtight, restrictive, and racially exclusionary … An expert generator of suspense, Keene also turns out to be a skilled humorist, a mischievous ironist, a deft, seductive storyteller and a studied historian." —Bookforum

PRAISE FOR ANNOTATIONS

"A dense, lyrically beautiful and highly experimental debut. Composed of short passages open to multiple interpretations, it defies easy description. Annotations could be described as a bildungsroman, as a collection of short recits by unnamed and undetermined narrators, an elegy to the rise and fall of Keene's native St. Louis, a meditation on the African American influence there and much, much more. Keene's masterful prose smoothly transgresses traditional lines of representation and description without ever seeming like an exercise in multi-thematic chaos. Annotations is an experimental work that pinpoints a new direction for literary fiction in the 21st century." —Publishers Weekly

"Keene's slim first novel appears to be a disguised autobiographical narrative whose power resides in formidable imagery and the virtuoso use of language. The plot, if there is one, concerns a young black man's coming of age from birth to college years. Along the way while commenting aphoristically, he encounters many characters with unique personal outlooks and participates in gay and straight sexual experiences that he seems to avoid as often as not. But one does not read this book for its story. In fact, it should be read twice: once to get an idea of events and a second time to savor its language and pounding images. Keene's artistry makes him a writer to watch." —​Library Journal
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, March 3, 2016
Other Stories: A Student Reading by Johanna Costigan, Cleo Egnal, and Anna Sones
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The Program in Written Arts and the Other Stories podcast present a reading by Bard students Johanna Costigan, Cleo Egnal, and Anna Sones.

The Other Stories is a platform where writers can share their work, and where editors, agents, and readers can discover new, struggling, and already established talent.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Tuesday, March 1, 2016
A Reading by Lila Dunlap and Micaela Morrissette
Anne Cox Chambers Alumni/ae Center  6:00 pm
Current Bard student Lila Dunlap ’17 and Bard alumna Micaela Morrissette ’02 read from their work, introduced by Robert Kelly.

The reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.
Current Bard student LILA DUNLAP is a poet from New Orleans. She has published two chapbooks: Red Levee and Bestiary, the latter of which can be downloaded as a PDF from Metambesen.org. She is learning Latin and ancient Greek.

Bard alumna MICAELA MORRISSETTE is the managing editor of Bard’s literary journal, Conjunctions, and the coordinator for Bard’s program in Written Arts. Her fiction has appeared in various print anthologies and online at BOMB, Tor.com, and elsewhere.
Sponsored by: Office of Alumni/ae Affairs; Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Monday, February 29, 2016
A Reading by Noy Holland
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  2:30 pm – 3:45 pm
The National Book Award nominee and author of BirdSpectacle of the BodyWhat Begins with Bird, and Swim for the Little One First reads from her work at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center. Introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations required.

"Ms. Holland habitually challenges the usual limits of language, but the effects of her exuberance are never precious, and often turn suddenly into beauty; her characters portray themselves in a discourse that is startling but genuine, the secret syntax of real lives." —New York Times Book Review

"Noy Holland animates what we struggle to keep unknown, the suppressed, the barely to be borne, in a prismatic, restless language that illuminates a heaven and hell of visions and want." —Joy Williams

"Strange, glittering, incantatory language marks Holland's provocative, nearly hypnotic stories." —Publishers Weekly

"The syncopated rhythms of Noy Holland’s rapturous prose jolt the heart and spark the senses." —Melanie Rae Thon

 
Sponsored by: Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Thursday, February 25, 2016
A Reading by Luc Sante
Bard Hall  7:00 pm
Award-winning author Luc Sante, Bard’s visiting professor of writing and photography, reads from his most recent book, The Other Paris.

The Other Paris offers a panoramic view of the shadow city within the great French metropolis, drawing on testimony from a great range of witnesses, from Balzac and Hugo to assorted boulevardiers, rabble-rousers, and tramps. Sante scuttles through the knotted streets of pre-Haussmann Paris, through the improvised accommodations of the original bohemians, through the whorehouses and dance halls and hobo shelters of the old city. A lively survey of labor conditions, prostitution, drinking, crime, and popular entertainment, and of the reporters, réaliste singers, pamphleteers, and poets who chronicled their evolution, The Other Paris is a book meant to upend the story of the French capital, to reclaim the city from the bons vivants and the speculators, and to hold a light to the works and lives of those expunged from its center by the forces of profit.

“This brilliant, beautifully written essay is the finest book I have ever read about Paris. Ever. Thank you, Luc Sante.” —Paul Auster

The Other Paris is a heartbreaking spectacle, immense in intellectual and political scope and emotional reach. Peopled by crooks and movie stars, gamblers and thinkers, the world’s premier city of dreams is rendered, through Luc Sante’s fine hand, historian’s eye, and poet’s heart, into a place we hardly knew-a world of hitherto unknown mysteries and realities. A grand journey in an epic work.” —Hilton Als

The reading takes place on 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 25th, in Bard Hall, and is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Books will be available for sale and signing from Oblong Books & Music.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
Monday, February 15, 2016
A Taste for Chaos: The Hidden Order in the Art of Improvisation
László Z. Bitó '60 Conservatory Building  5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
On Monday, February 15, 2016 the Hannah Arendt Center, Music Program, Bard College Conservatory of Music, Office of Development and Alumni/ae Affairs and Language & Literature Program will host "A Taste for Chaos: The Hidden Order in the Art of Improvisation. Special Guests include: Composer, George Lewis and author of A Taste for Chaos: The Art Of Literary Improvisation, Randy Fertel, and Oliver Lake.

The Oxford English Dictionary defines improvisation as a “work or structure produced on the spur of the moment.” But this is not quite right. Improvisation, writes Randy Fertel,"claims to be spontaneous, off the cuff, uncrafted, careless, inspired, chaotic.” But beyond these claims, improvisation follows an unbending order. This has been true since Plato, who wrote, "all the good poets use no art at all, but they are inspired and possessed when they utter all these beautiful poems… Beautiful poems are not human, not made by man, but divine and made by God: and the poets are nothing but the gods’ interpreters.” For millennia, art has imagined that poetic improvisation was free, but also guided by a hidden logic. Jazz, writes Ralph Ellison, "springs from a contest in which each artist challenges all the rest; each solo flight, or improvisation, represents…a definition of his identity as individual, as member of the collectivity and as a link in the chain of tradition. Thus, because jazz finds its very life in an endless improvisation upon traditional materials, the jazzman must lose his identity even as he finds it.” Improvisation situates music in a productive tension between individual freedom and sentient order. Freedom as an aspect of improvisation means that individuals are free only insofar as they act in ways that are both free and constrained. This is very much what Hannah Arendt means when she writes that "Men are free—as distinguished from their possessing the gift of freedom— as long as they act, neither before nor after; for to be free and to act are the same.” In this evening on "A Taste for Chaos: The Hidden Order in the Art of Improvisation,” we bring together leading thinkers and musicians to explore the nature of improvisation and the arts of freedom. 

Randy Fertel holds a Ph.D. in English and American literature from Harvard University, where he received a student-voted teaching award. He has taught English at Harvard, Tulane, LeMoyne College, and the New School for Social Research. He specializes in the literature of the Vietnam War and the literature of exile. Fertel is president of the Fertel Foundation and co-founded, with the Nation Institute, the Ridenhour Prizes for Courageous Truth-Telling, named for My Lai whistleblower and investigative reporter Ron Ridenhour. He lives in New Orleans and New York.

George E. Lewis is the Edwin H. Case Professor of American Music at Columbia University. A fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Lewis’s other honors include a MacArthur Fellowship (2002) and a Guggenheim Fellowship (2015). A member of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM) since 1971, Lewis’s creative work has been presented by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra,  Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart, International Contemporary Ensemble, and others. His widely acclaimed book, A Power Stronger Than Itself:  The AACM and American Experimental Music (University of Chicago Press, 2008) received the American Book Award, and in 2015, Lewis received the degree of Doctor of Music from the University of Edinburgh.  Lewis and Benjamin Piekut are co-editors of the forthcoming two-volume Oxford Handbook of Critical Improvisation Studies (2016).Oliver Lake Renowned saxophonist, composer, painter and poet Oliver Lake’s half century-long career is unparalleled. From collaborations with the Brooklyn Philharmonic, Flux String Quartet, Bjork, Lou Reed, A Tribe Called Quest, Mos Def and Me’shell Ndegeocello, to his co-founding of the Black Artist Group (BAG) and the highly acclaimed World Saxophone Quartet, creation of his non-profit Passin’ Thru organization, becoming a mainstay with Pittsburgh’s City of Asylum, publishing two books of poetry and frequently having original artwork displayed in exhibitions across the country, Oliver Lake views it all as part of the same whole.SCHEDULE: 
5 pm - 5:30pm Randy Fertel, followed by a 15 min. Q&A 
5:45pm Oliver Lake Featured Instrumentalist & Composer with Bard Contemporary Jazz Composers Ensemble (2 sets)
6 pm - 6:30pm George Lewis, followed by a 15 min. Q&A
6:45pm Oliver Lake with Bard Contemporary Jazz Composers Ensemble (2 sets)
7 pm Concluding Remarks: George Lewis, Randy Fertel, and Oliver Lake
Reception To Follow

Location: László Z. Bitó '60 Conservatory Building : MAP
Parking is available in the rear of the building in the Avery/Blum Parking Lot.
Date: February 15th
Free & Open to the Public


Sponsored by: Bard College Conservatory of Music; Hannah Arendt Center; Literature Program; Music Program; Office of Development and Alumni/ae Affairs
Contact: The Hannah Arendt Center  cstanton@bard.edu
  Friday, February 12, 2016
Careers in Publishing: A Conversation with Lorin Stein (Editor) & Anna Stein (Agent)
Campus Center, Weis Cinema  4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Lorin Stein, editor of The Paris Review, and Anna Stein, an agent at International Creative Management, discuss careers in publishing, in a conversation moderated by Mona Simpson, author of Casebook and a Bard writer in residence.

Lorin Stein became the third editor in chief of the prestigious literary magazine The Paris Review after serving as a senior editor at the publishing house Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Under his editorship, The Paris Review has won two National Magazine Awards. Books edited by Stein have received the National Book Award, the Pulitzer Prize, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Believer Book Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award. His reviews of fiction and poetry and his translations from French have appeared in The New York Review of Books,Harper'sThe London Review of BooksThe New Republicn+1, and elsewhere. His translation of Edouard Levé's Autoportrait was nominated for the Best Translated Book Award, and in 2015 FSG published his translation of Michel Houellebecq's Submission.

Literary agent Anna Stein joined International Creative Management in 2015. Prior to her career at ICM, she opened and ran the New York office of Aitken Alexander Associates (2009–2015) and was an agent and foreign rights manager at the Irene Skolnick Literary Agency.

The conversation takes place Friday, February 12th, at 4:00 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, and is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.
Sponsored by: Written Arts Program
Contact: Micaela Morrissette  845-758-7054  mmorriss@bard.edu
  Thursday, February 11, 2016
Bard Papers Info Session
Annual Arts and Literary Journal!
Avery 117  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
BARD PAPERS is an annual literary and arts journal that draws submissions from undergraduate students and faculty at Bard College. We are currently seeking a core staff to review submitted works on a weekly basis. If interested in discussing visual and written work, and curating this quintessentially Bard publication, please attend! More information, and an application form, is available here: http://www.bardpapers.org/
Contact: Bard Papers  347-423-1495  papers@bard.edu